Checklist S8939819

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Nocturnal

Owner Marshall Iliff

Traveling
  • 1
  • 0.8 mi
Comments

I arrived well before dawn and did a full circuit here to the manure pits and back. Apparently other birds were around, not surprisingly, since others reported a Lark Sparrow and Connecticut Warbler (unsure of the reliability of either) along the entrance road. WEATHER: Partly cloudy, calm, 70 F.

Observations

  1. Number observed: 150

    Comments: several flocks of migrants and a couple other flocks of locals

  2. Number observed: 6
  3. Number observed: 2
  4. duck sp.

    Number observed: 45

    Comments: presumably mostly Wood Ducks; seen flying around at the south end of the fields

  5. Number observed: 5
  6. Number observed: 3
  7. Number observed: 1

    Comments: **rare; continuing adult reported yesterday by Scott Surner at all. Seen and heard calling 'gar-oooooo-ahh' as it flew around the west sides of the fields. Long narrow neck held straight out with knobby head, red crown extended well past the eye (eliminating G. c. canadensis). Long legs trailing behind body. Gray plumage. Photos. Finally flew off at 7:15, and many other birds saw its exit flight.

  8. Number observed: 1

    Comments: calling flyover seen and heard well; I assume it landed in the fields somewhere

  9. Number observed: 2

    Comments: calling pre-dawn

  10. Number observed: 1

    Comments: juv; in puddle in manure pits

  11. Number observed: 2

    Comments: *rare; one adult and one fresh juv; my first for the Cumbies area

  12. Number observed: 14

    Comments: max count seen flying around at one time

  13. Number observed: 1

    Comments: juv; in puddle in manure pits; rather late for Cumbies

  14. Number observed: 5

    Comments: several birds heard calling in flight during pre-dawn

  15. Number observed: 2

    Comments: juv; in puddle in manure pits

  16. Number observed: 1

    Comments: flyover

  17. Number observed: 1
  18. Number observed: 7
  19. Number observed: 2
  20. Number observed: 3
  21. Number observed: 1

    Comments: responded to whistling near parking area before dawn

  22. Number observed: 1

    Comments: calling at north end of fields before dawn

  23. Number observed: 2

    Comments: two birds giving full calls from west side of fields; very well heard and only my second for Cumbies

  24. Number observed: 2

    Comments: including a bird that landed on the tall bare tree in the center of the manure pits and scattered the swallows

  25. Number observed: 1
  26. Number observed: 1
  27. Number observed: 1
  28. Number observed: 1
  29. Number observed: 4
  30. Number observed: 27
  31. Number observed: 500

    Comments: rough estimate; at least this many birds landed in the are tree, but there may have been another 500 in flight around the fields

  32. Number observed: 2

    Comments: **late; at least two birds (the maximum seen at once), which included two birds perched together in cherry tree. Photos. Small, brown-backed swallow with paler rump, white breast, complete brown breastband with pale scaling and dark spike down center of chest.

  33. Number observed: 5

    Comments: *late; minimum count, with five seen at once perched in the cherry tree to the east of the bare tree. The Barn and Bank Swallows were all flying around the manure pools on the east side of the manure pits area. There may have been a few more.

  34. Number observed: 1
  35. Number observed: 2

    Comments: one in manure pits area; how often have I had them here? Another sign of titmouse migration?

  36. Number observed: 1
  37. Number observed: 3
  38. Number observed: 2

    Comments: one in manure pits area

  39. Number observed: 1

    Comments: in manure pits area

  40. Number observed: 70

    Comments: leaving roost at dawn

  41. Number observed: 2
  42. Number observed: 1

    Comments: heard calling in manure pits; my first for the area, with my only other one back in August at the south end ponds

  43. Number observed: 1
  44. Number observed: 15
  45. Number observed: 7
  46. Number observed: 4
  47. Number observed: 3
  48. Number observed: 1
  49. Number observed: 3

    Comments: call notes and partial songs heard

  50. Number observed: 1
  51. Number observed: 5
  52. Number observed: 90
  53. Number observed: 50
  54. Number observed: 7

    Comments: at least 3 seen and four others heard giving 'chup' notes

  55. Number observed: 20
  56. Number observed: 8
  57. Number observed: 20
  58. Number observed: 20
  59. Number observed: 1

    Comments: flyover with starlings

  60. Number observed: 2
  61. Number observed: 1
  62. Number observed: 2
  63. Number observed: 4
  64. warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)

    Number observed: 2

    Comments: buzzy notes, presumably Blackpoll

  65. Number observed: 3
  66. Number observed: 1

    Comments: *rare; heard giving loud, metallic 'chink' note from the cornfields just west of the entrance road near the parking lot

  67. Number observed: 2
  68. Number observed: 1

    Comments: *rare; dullish immature with faint wash of yellow on the sides

  69. Number observed: 1

    Comments: **rare escapee; seen around the three mounds on the left just after one enters the manure pits area. photos; bluish-gray bill with strong curve to culmen and commissure; blackish plumage with narrow yellow should on lesser secondary coverts. Brilliant white flash in primary coverts only visible in flight. Tail medium length and with shorter central tail feathers as though in molt. About the size of Lark Bunting (it was first reported as this species 2 days ago). It flew fast and dove suddenly in to cover. It appeared to be quite shy and flushed easily, but I also saw it sitting atop a Phragmites stalk near the grass seeds, which few North American species would do. I got photos but they were poor through some grasses--Hank Levesque and John Hoye both got much better ones that amply confirm the species ID. A new escapee record for Mass?