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Checklist S6814630

 
Location
Ocean Shores, Grays Harbor County, Washington, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Fri Aug 27, 2010 3:45 PM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
3
Duration:
2 hour(s), 45 minute(s)
Distance:
1.0 mile(s)
Observers:
Bill Tweit , Whittier Johnson List
Species
30 species (+2 other taxa) total
5
1
1
6
1
2
1

This bird was found on Aug 26 by Bob Sundstrom at the Tonquin Access to the Oyehut Sink area. I went looking for it on the 2th, with Scott Mills and Whittier Johnson. We arrived at 3:30PM, to find that Charley Wright had the bird in his scope. We stayed in the area until 6:30, keeping the Sand-Plover under observation most of the time, and enjoying the other shorebirds
present in excellent viewing conditions. At least ten other birders were present, including Alan Richards. Sunny skies, light breeze, cool temps (60s), so few heat distortions. Distance to the bird ranged from 200+ meters to as close as 50m. I used a Swarovski scope, generally zoomed to 40x. Scott Mills got photos. I noted the following details:

A very plump, small headed, leggy plover, with a long pointed rear end. About 1/3 larger than nearby Semipalmated Plovers, with a uniform brown back that is a couple of shades lighter brown than SEPL. Facing us, shows a broad wash of light rusty brown across chest, grading into white belly and undertail coverts. Rusty breast band is sharply separated from white throat by a narrow black border. White throat and chin extend back onto subauriculars, bordered on top by a narrow black eye line, that is narrowest in front of the eye and reaches all the way to the bill. Conspicuous white supercilium above black eye line that meets above the bill on the forehead, and is bordered by narrow blackish edging to brown crown. Black edging is strongest above the bill. Crown, nape, back, wing coverts and even folded primaries and tertials are relatively uniform brown. In flight, white wing stripe is a bit weaker than SEPL wing stripe, could not get a good look at rump pattern. Long legs are dull gray, beak is black. Beak is larger and stouter than SEPL, but not strongly so. Did not hear it call.

The face pattern is unusual, seemingly more in basic plumage, while the breast pattern was still clearly alternate plumage. Not sure whether this was a weakly marked male or a strongly marked female. Both the white forehead and the narrow black border to the brown chest band indicate mongolus.

25
1
1
2
30
1
1
400
1
7
4
10
25
30
Western x Glaucous-winged Gull (hybrid)
6
10
1
1
2
6
American/Northwestern Crow
4
10
2
4
2
Additional species seen by Whittier Johnson:
6
American Crow
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes