Checklist S57917021

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Owner Jay Packer

Traveling
  • 1
  • 1.75 mi

Observations

  1. Number observed: 2
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  2. Number observed: 2
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  3. Number observed: 3
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  4. Number observed: 1
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  5. Number observed: 8
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. Number observed: 7
  8. Number observed: 20
  9. Number observed: 1

    Comments: I assume it was a male, though I'm sure it could have been a female

    Breeding Code: A Agitated Behavior (Probable)
  10. Number observed: 1
  11. Number observed: 1
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  12. Number observed: 1
    Breeding Code: FL Recently Fledged Young (Confirmed)
  13. Number observed: 2

    Comments: These birds almost certainly bred here this year. I think I had a pair this morning but there's a chance it was only one bird.

    Breeding Code: S7 Singing Male Present 7+ days (Probable)
  14. Number observed: 1

    Comments: Female. I didn't see the male today, but given that I saw him multiple times in this exact location in the burned area south of Pecan Grove, I indicated a pair in suitable habitat for the breeding code.

    Breeding Code: P Pair in Suitable Habitat (Probable)
  15. Number observed: 4
    Breeding Code: S7 Singing Male Present 7+ days (Probable)
  16. Number observed: 1
    Breeding Code: S7 Singing Male Present 7+ days (Probable)
  17. Number observed: 4
    Breeding Code: S7 Singing Male Present 7+ days (Probable)
  18. Number observed: 1
  19. Number observed: 6
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  20. Number observed: 10
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  21. Number observed: 4
  22. swallow sp.

    Number observed: 1
  23. Number observed: 8

    Comments: Singing throughout the park and a few were seen.

    Breeding Code: M Multiple (7+) Singing Males (Probable)
  24. Number observed: 6
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  25. Number observed: 1
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  26. Number observed: 1
    Breeding Code: FL Recently Fledged Young (Confirmed)
  27. Number observed: 1
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  28. Number observed: 1

    Comments: Calling overhead but may have been perched.

  29. Number observed: 2
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  30. Number observed: 1

    Comments: While on the trail east and adjacent to the bird blind, I heard a warbler chip note that immediately got my attention. (Besides Black-and-white Warbler, there’s not really any summer warblers expected.) I played a few seconds of Eastern Screech-Owl and sure enough, the bird popped up and gave a look. At first glance, I was struck by the appearance of the bird. It looked unlike anything I’d ever seen. A close study of the plumage led me to confidently conclude that it was a very young immature Northern Parula. The bird was very dull gray overall, slightly darker on the upperparts than the underparts. It clearly had one white wing bar on the edge of what I believe were the greater coverts. There might have been another wing bar below it, but I didn’t note this at the time. In other words, I’m certain there was at least one wing bar but can’t say for sure about the second. The upper breast had two diffuse spots of yellow/orange on either side. The area just underneath the throat also showed a diffuse orange/yellow spot. There were two faint white eye arcs above and below the eyes. The bill was thin, sharply pointed, and bicolored; the upper mandible being dark and the lower mandible flesh or apricot colored. The legs and feet were dull but flesh colored. Taken together, these features lead to the conclusion that it was a very young immature Northern Parula. Also supportive of this identifciation, Internet image searches for ‘immature Northern Paurla’ show a few extremely similar birds that look almost identical to what I saw. Finally, in speaking to several other birders around the state, the general assumption is this bird’s presence is likely explained by post-breeding dispersal rather than nesting parulas in Taylor County. One can’t rule out for certain that parulas didn’t nest somewhere along Elm Creek nearby, but it seems more likely this bird was born along a river in Central Texas or perhaps the Dallas/Fort Worth area and flew a bit far from home after fledging. Whatever its origin, an early July record of Northern Parula was a pleasant and unexpected find.

    Media:
  31. Number observed: 4
    Breeding Code: S7 Singing Male Present 7+ days (Probable)
  32. Number observed: 12
    Breeding Code: P Pair in Suitable Habitat (Probable)
  33. Number observed: 2

    Comments: Also have chink calls.

    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
  34. Number observed: 2
    Breeding Code: S Singing Male (Possible)
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