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Checklist S52796419

 
Location
Walden Ponds Wildlife Habitat (Walden & Sawhill Ponds all together), Boulder County, Colorado, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:44 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
32
Duration:
2 hour(s), 54 minute(s)
Distance:
4.8 kilometer(s)
Observers:
Ted Floyd
Comments:
Walked the entire outer perimeter; distance per Google Distance Calculator. With participants in an outing with The Front Range Birding Company. Ponds mostly iced over, but with open water in places; a bit of snow cover still in places; trails frozen mud. Sunny at the outset, then cloudy and chilly; temp around freezing.
Species
32 species (+7 other taxa) total
1

Nice flyover, calling.

X

A few were this taxon, but didn't try to sort them out amongst the ~75 reported under Cackling/Canada Goose, below.

X

Flyovers too high up to ID to subspecies group ("taxon").

1

Big Ugly, all the way.

15

With the Big Ugly in the field just east of Cottonwood Marsh.

75
Cackling/Canada Goose

Flyovers, too far for safe ID.

24

Mostly Cottonwood; also flyovers.

4

Duck Pond.

15

Duck Pond, Cottonwood Marsh, pond west of Cottonwood.

40

Mostly Boulder Creek. We studied all Mallards closely, carefully ruling out the possibility of Mexican Duck.

36

1x1 count, Cottonwood Marsh; the males were chorusing, a lovely and lonely sound, like being on the steppes of Central Asia.

22

Duck Pond. They were feeding actively, with some disappearing under the ice, which made me nervous on their behalf. Also one on the private bond with the goldeneyes; see below.

3

Private pond, west end of Walden. Three drakes.

8

1 at Duck Pond, 6 at Sawhill, 1 on Boulder Creek.

7

"Flying bowling pins"--going over.

1
Red Junglefowl (Domestic type)

1 was singing steadily, fields south of Sawhill.

200

The continuing flock, widely dispersed amongst the high-tension wires, the "flying saucer" field, and even out on the ice at Cottonwood. Many color morphs in this fascinating flock.

1
pigeon/dove sp.

Faintly heard one along Boulder Creek, but the creek was noisy and my companions noisier still, and I just couldn't tell for sure which species it was.

4

Cottonwood Marsh; 3 adults, 1 first-cycle (second-year).

5

Including four lined up along the bank of the private pond, back/west end of Walden. The other was at Cottonwood Marsh proper; perhaps there were two there.

1

Flyover adult, probably a male, above Boulder Creek. It was soaring and banking a bit, and we commented about the harrier-like white "rump."

2

Two adult hanging out about the tall pole that separates Wally Toev's Pond from Cottonwood Marsh.

ML141277851

© Ted Floyd

4

Widespread, including an apparent pair or pairs. Didn't see the long-present Harlan's-like bird.

2

One heard near Duck Pond, the other along Boulder Creek.

1

A beauty in at Cottonwood Marsh.

2

Two widely dispersed screamers.

2

North side of Walden, in the Russian olives.

5

Widely scattered.

2

Nice croakers; seen too.

14
1

Along Boulder Creek near the sewerage inflow. It was a glorious sight, walking up and down the rugose boughs of an ancient and stately creekside willow, doing the random walk thing, every which way. Although it never gave a full-on call note, the bird frequently gave those little "pip" sounds, endearingly squeaky. The nuthatch just walked around erratically, doing its thing, neither interested in coming in close to see us, nor particularly scared off. After several minutes of gobsmacked amazement, we reluctantly moved along. Chip Clouse was in the bathroom the whole time we saw this bird. It would have been a year bird for him. I feel terrible for Chip (we call him "Chip the dip"), but I'm also so delighted that the rest of us in the group got to enjoy this most marvelous of avian apparitions.

ML141141521

© Ted Floyd

Average Quality

I would guess -nelsoni- on this, just based on range and probability; however, I don't know for sure. Anyhow, a most glorious bird, charming and winsome.

Age:
Unknown
Sex:
Sex Unknown
1

One gave "yarnk" calls that sounded Eastern-ish to me. Not sure; no recording.

1

Right near the nuthatches. A most excellent bird, working the low part of the trunk--practically down on the roots--of a large cottonwood right along the trail. We didn't realize it at the time, but this would have been a year bird for Chip Clouse. However, he was in the restroom at the time, and he missed it.

4

Including one by the marsh which we studied in some detail; see photo and notes below. A fine bird indeed, but, alas, it distracted me from the NORTH AMERICAN MINK that others in the group espied at the same time.

ML141142391

© Ted Floyd

Average Quality

This bird is apparently an adult by the lack of molt limits and by the dark alula. See next pic, showing the broad primary tips typical of an adult. I am calling it a male because it was sort of singing; more info on that below.

Age:
Adult
Sex:
Male
ML141144861

© Ted Floyd

Average Quality

Note the broad primary tips, an ASY character. On both this image and on ML14112391, you can see a metal band on the bird's right tarsus. How cool is that!

Age:
Adult
Sex:
Male
ML141147751

© Ted Floyd

Average Quality

The bird sang an elaborate and lengthy, but very soft, song. Even though we were quite close to the bird, the song was difficult to hear. Th bird barely opened its bill as it sang, "singing through clenched teeth."

Age:
Adult
Sex:
Male
4

In tall cottonwoods, north side of Boulder Creek.

8

Mostly along Boulder Creek, near 75th Street (although we didn't get quite that far downstream).

2

Widely spaced fly-overs: potato CHIP.

4

In the cattails, throughout. One was singing pretty decently along Boulder Creek.

10

Including several males singing at Cottonwood Marsh when we arrived.

 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes