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Checklist S49110269

 
Location
Pt. Reyes--Abbotts Lagoon, Marin County, California, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Wed Oct 10, 2018 1:08 PM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
2
Duration:
2 hour(s), 8 minute(s)
Distance:
2.0 mile(s)
Observers:
Adrian Hinkle
Submitted from eBird Android, version 1.9.1
Species
51 species (+1 other taxa) total
6
30
5
50
40
100
10
200
dabbling duck sp.

Probably mostly wigeon and shovelers, but I didn't study them closely.

45
2
6
2
1
1
25
13
50

41 counted on beach. More on the lagoon.

1

This bird was first found mid-day on Monday by Mark Sawyer. However, he didn't post his photo until this morning, so nobody looked for it yesterday.

Today we had planned to bird the outer point, so his report made for an easy decision on where to start our afternoon. Upon arriving at the main lagoon a little after 1pm, we could see a number of shorebirds scattered on the north and southwest sides. A few dozen Semipalmated and a few Snowy Plovers (plus some peeps; total maybe 100 small shorebirds) were on the northwest shore, which is where Mark had the bird on Monday. This is a sandy area with sparse vegetation. There is only a little bit of mud along the shoreline, but most of the birds here were roosting and not actively foraging. No Common Ringed Plover was present. Fortunately, after then checking the southwest shoreline, we swung by the beach and I spotted the plover roosting with 41 Snowy Plovers and several Semipalmateds. This was directly between the lagoon and the ocean, in the dry sand, at 2:25pm. After a while, the plover moved over to the NW corner of the lagoon and roosted, then foraged, with Semipalmated Plovers. It did not vocalize.

Identification: The following field marks rule out Semipalmated Plover.
-Extensive white supercilium behind eye. This was obvious regardless of the bird's posture (sitting, standing, foraging, flying) or the lighting (ranging from bright sunlight to complete overcast). The same can be said about the other field marks described below.
-Brown ear coverts indicate that this is a female. Female SEPL could show some white on the supercilium, but not as extensive as on this bird.
-Extensive black on face, including from the ear coverts all the way to the bill, extending from the top of the bill to the gape, not tapering near the bill as in SEPL.
-Thicker breastband. While this varied depending on angle, and although there were no alternate plumage SEPL to compare with, the breast band was substantially thicker than what I've ever seen on SEPL
-White forehead more extensive, extending to a point below the eye
-No eyering
-Seemed longer bodied and thinner-billed than SEPL. The former is especially obvious in the photos, while both were also apparent in the field. It wasn't noticeably bulkier than the Semipalmated Plovers.
-No toe webbing, including between the outer two toes; easily visible both in the field (standing still; hard to see while walking) and in photos (both white foot raised/walking, and white foot resting on sand).

ML118376821

© Adrian Hinkle

Average Quality
Age:
Adult
Sex:
Female
ML118376831

© Adrian Hinkle

Average Quality
Age:
Adult
Sex:
Female
ML118392751

© Adrian Hinkle

Average Quality
Age:
Adult
Sex:
Female
ML118393711

© Adrian Hinkle

Average Quality
Age:
Adult
Sex:
Female
ML118394651

© Adrian Hinkle

Average Quality
Age:
Adult
Sex:
Female
35
150
25
250
4
ML118391661

© Adrian Hinkle

40
8
1
10
1

Adult flyby

6
20
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
16
1
5

A single flock was on the southwest side of the lagoon. I inadvertently flushed them twice (never saw them landed), both times from flat, sparse sandy areas mixed with grasses. The were large sparrow-like birds, larger than Savannah Sparrows, with short tails and fairly long wings. They were buffy with some streaks on the breast, and markings on the auriculars. I couldn't take a close look at the plumage because they were flying away. However, all had thin white tail edges and thus the wrong pattern for similar longspurs. Unique call: dry rattle about a second long, repeated a couple times, with occasional soft "chew" note mixed in. Familar with this species; expected location and timing for them, I would imagine.

1
7
1
1
1
1
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes