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Checklist S48840772

 
Location
Lake Los Carneros Park, Santa Barbara County, California, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:15 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
1
Duration:
2 hour(s), 40 minute(s)
Distance:
2.014 mile(s)
Observers:
John Callender
Comments:
N/A
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.7.33
Species
58 species (+4 other taxa) total
2
1
swan sp.

Continuing hybrid

1
Blue-winged/Cinnamon Teal
4
5
30
2
4
1
1
6
3
Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
19
3
2
Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher

Noting in passing that the high-powered birders who were in the area for the reported Alder Flycatcher described these two birds as Long-billed.

ML116915821

© John Callender

Average Quality
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
ML116921341

© John Callender

Average Quality
1
6
ML116918931

© John Callender

Average Quality

Juvenile male (I think?). I was interested by the eye colors of these two birds, which were associating in a tree near the boardwalk that crosses the marshy area near the north end of the lake. Some googling led me to http://ibis.geog.ubc.ca/biodiversity/efauna/documents/AcornWoodpecker-RT-j.pdf, which explains that the juveniles have dark eyes that lighten to the adult's light eyes before the first post juvenile molt is complete. I assumed at first that this bird was a male based on the head pattern (lacking the dark bar that separates the red and cream areas on females), but the same paper says all juveniles have the male head pattern. I think this one is likely a male regardless, because it has the larger beak that the NatGeo guide says is indicative of a male.

ML116919021

© John Callender

Average Quality

Juvenile male (I think?)

ML116919081

© John Callender

Average Quality

Adult female

ML116919121

© John Callender

Average Quality

Adult female

2
1
1
1
1

I suspected this was a Willow Flycatcher when I photographed it, but after helpful experts weighed in I realized I almost surely misidentified a Western Wood Peewee. In hindsight the dark tip on the lower mandible and the hint of a dark "vest" on the breast and belly tend in that direction. Also, I realized in retrospect that I had no specific recollection of tail-pumping, which I would expect to have seen had this actually been an empid.

ML116917001

© John Callender

Average Quality
3
3
4
16
3
12
ML116915221

© John Callender

Average Quality

Female in (male) coyote brush

ML116915291

© John Callender

Average Quality

Male

ML116915351

© John Callender

Average Quality

Female (with male in the background)

2
1
2
4
ML116920181

© John Callender

Average Quality
4
4
2
2
1
2
8
40
ML116915721

© John Callender

Average Quality
2
2
6
3
13
4
7
7
6
4
2
1

Nonbreeding female Rose-breasted Grosbeak. The bird was in the tall eucs at the southwest corner of the visitor parking. I based the ID initially mainly on the dark streaking across the center of the breast. After soliciting and receiving much helpful input from experts via the sbcobirding email list, I'd add that the wing linings in the blurry flight photo appear to be a somewhat darker "mustard" yellow, rather than the Black-headed Grosbeak's "lemon" yellow.

ML116923491

© John Callender

Average Quality
ML116923501

© John Callender

Average Quality
ML116923511

© John Callender

Average Quality
ML116923531

© John Callender

Average Quality
ML116923561

© John Callender

Average Quality

Upper left, with Western Tanager.

1
ML116923161

© John Callender

Average Quality
ML116923171

© John Callender

Average Quality
17
ML116919661

© John Callender

Average Quality
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes