AudioDateDownLeftRightUpIconCloseDownload iconfacebookReportGallerySettingsGiftLanguageGridLanguage iconListMapMenunoAudionoPhotoPhotoPlayPlusSearchStartwitterUserVideo

Checklist S47031763

 
Location
Everglades NP--Flamingo, Monroe County, Florida, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sat Feb 04, 2012
Protocol:
Historical
Party Size:
2
Observers:
Tony Frank
Species
32 species total
X
X
1

Medium to large size shorebird in non-breeding plumage observed in a flock
with Willet and Marbled Godwits. It appeared to stand as tall as nearby
Willets (Tringa semipalmatus), but noticeably not as tall as Marbled Godwits
(Limosa fedoa). The bill was definitely had a slight curve upwards. Bill
looked thin, e.g., not as thick as a Willet’s bill. The bill of the Willet
is very straight and this was very discernible. The bill also appeared
slightly longer than a Willet’s bill. The bill was dark at the tip. The
dark color extended up the bill and as it neared the base the bill turned a
light orange color. This color was not as bright an orange as a Marbled
Godwit’s bill. The head of the bird was grayish in color. The neck also
appeared the same gray. The back of the bird was same gray color as head
but
did have some black feathering in the coverts and scapulars that created
appearance of lines running across the back and “sides of back” but not
onto the flank area. The back marking was quite distinctive and different
from the superficially similar gray-backed Willet that has no black on it
when wings are folded. The chin and throat area appeared to be a dusky
“smeared” gray. The rest of the underneath of the bird was white
appearing. The legs look dark. When the bird opened its wing enough to see
the rump area (either by preening or jumping up), the rump area appeared to
be a mottled gray with black running through it to give an appearance of
very
fine checker gray and black checker board. (There was no white in rump at
all. This would indicate that this bird is an Asian subspecies form,
baueri.) When wings were slightly opened when “jumping up,” they
appeared mostly same gray color as the back. The underside of primaries and
secondaries appeared a lighter gray than back and upperside of wing, but not
white. (These details were submitted to the Florida Bird Records Committee)

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes