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Checklist S46487283

 
Location
Pawnee Lake SRA, Lancaster County, Nebraska, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:41 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
1
Duration:
5 hour(s), 39 minute(s)
Distance:
6.0 mile(s)
Observers:
Larry Einemann
Species
50 species (+1 other taxa) total
16
2
2
4
1
3
9
1
14
1
33

11 at the marina beach and 22 on the mud flat on the northwest arm. Water level up a bit and into emergent vegetation; hence less shorebird habitat. THIS SPECIES TYPICALLY LATE GOING THROUGH IN SPRING AND IS MORE LIKELY THAN SOME NOT FLAGGED AS RARE.

1
1
2

One was seen on west beach. So I made my way there. It was a first summer gull--dark, large beak and dark legs; No white in primaries with a gray wash on neck and some on sides. It was by itself. Later on it flew in to the northwest mud flat. Here were two other hooded gulls. One was very wary and kept in the flooded emergent vegetation, making it hard to see. It was quit far away. The other was a transition gull (nonbreeding to breeding) with some red in bill, dark legs. It had dark brown primaries with no white markings. The bill was large with some red and drooped at the tip. The wing tips were longer than the tail. It was found on the NW arm in the emergent, flooded vegetation. At one time, the two adult birds were briefly in close proximity, but did not hang out together. One of them flew in closer so I could DEB it despite the gusty wind.

1
1
Larus sp.

iT WAS A BLACK-HEADED GULL, BUT IT HID IN EMERGENT FLOODED VEGETATION SO IT COULD HAVE BEEN ANOTHER ADULT LAUGHING GULL OR A FRANKLIN'S GULL.

1
3
1
2
3
4
4
1
2
1
3
2
1
25
11
3
6
41
2
8
9
3
2
2
1
1
9

Driving through the loop around the northeast campground area, I saw a large cottonwood tree limb had fallen that morning. The main branch was propped against the tree trunk. It had fallen from some 30 feet up. The outermost branches on the large limb on part of the fallen limb remained some 4 feet off the ground. I noticed a Baltimore oriole nest in these branches. I looked inside and saw one recently hatched chick and an oriole egg. I watched for some 10 minutes. The female came to the nest about 4 or 5 times and the male made one appearance. The male oriole had one medium-sized green caterpillar. It made about 10 attempts to feed the caterpillar to the chick inside the nest. Perhaps as the limb fell some of the contents were spilled. The nest site and nesting attempt will likely fail as i am sure the limb will be hauled away in a short period of time and turned into mulch..

19
6
43
1
1
1
12
1
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes