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Checklist S44710341

 
Location
Florida, Monroe, Dry Tortugas National Park, Garden Key, Monroe County, Florida, US ( Map )
Date and Effort
Wed Apr 11, 2018 7:47 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
2
Duration:
4 hour(s), 51 minute(s)
Distance:
4.0 mile(s)
Observers:
Bill Pranty , Valeri Ponzo List
Comments:
With Valeri Ponzo; thanks to the extreme generosity of Jeanne Dubi, we were part of a Florida Nature Tours trip led by Wes Biggs and Dave Goodwin. Unlike yesterday afternoon, when Val and I stayed inside Fort Jefferson, this morning we also explored the moat, the campground, and the brick piles. We stopped for lunch (served in the campground by the crew of the Playmate) at 1238, which ended this eBird checklist. Othher taxa: a barracuda and many groupers in the moat.

2018-04-11 barracuda

2018-04-11 grouper

2018-04-11 fort jeff d

Val with a friend.

2018-04-11 fort jeff c

2018-04-11 fort jeff a

2018-04-11 fort jeff e

2018-04-11 fort jeff f

2018-04-11 fort jeff b

From the campground, we walked around the fort as much as possible, but a section of the moat perimeter was broken off by Hurricane Irma in September 2017.

2018-04-11 bush key sign

The sign to Bush Key, which is now connected to Hospital Key; because of the nesting seabirds, we did not travel beyond this sign.
Species
41 species (+1 other taxa) total
1

Bill only

4

Huddled together in a copse of Buttonwoods

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

1

Singing

1
1

© Bill Pranty

2

Adult male and a presumed adult female in the flowering Geiger Tree inside the restricted rangers' residence

8

Perched on the southern coaling dock remains

X
X

Hundreds at least visible on Bush Key

1

Perched on the southern coaling dock remains; Bill only

25

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

9

5 and 4

1
1

Adult

© Bill Pranty

7

© Bill Pranty

1

Maybe they're regular here, but I was surprised to see this (I presume it was _carolinensis_ but I don't remember looking at the face).

1

Feeding on a palm trunk in the campground while campers were within 6 feet! Not in my field notebook.

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

2

Male and female

© Bill Pranty

1

Adult

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

1

Presumably the same bird from yesterday; it was in the same copse of Buttonwoods (I took no photographs of it today).

1

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

3
1
2
1
martin sp. (Progne sp.)

Female-plumaged overhead

1
15

Many more than here yesterday

© Bill Pranty

Perched on a cushion onboard the Playmate as we disembarked

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

3

Val found 2 freshly dead inside the parade grounds; Wes was to give the carcasses to Archbold Biological Station.

© Bill Pranty

1

I just found this species in my photographs! Val was not with me at the time.

© Bill Pranty

3

Singles

1

I flushed it point-blank between 3 palms literally inches from the picnic table where lunch was being served. The sparrow flew to the fort and briefly perched awkwardly on one of the bricks on the fort's main wall. I nearly got a photograph, but the sparrow then flew inside one of the "windows" on the second floor of the fort. It perched for a few seconds with its head visible above the bricks. I saw an obvious sparrow (small, overall brown landbird) with a grayish face and a narrow white eyering. It wasn't a great look but considering the location -- coupled with Savannah Sparrow and Grasshopper Sparrow being easily ruled out -- I'm confident of the identification.

When Wes joined us 10 minutes later, we told him about the sparrow. He had seen a sparrow in the campground Sea Grapes near the helipad earlier that morning, and although his look was similarly brief and incomplete, Wes felt that the bird was a Lincoln's Sparrow.

1

Adult male not yet in full alternate plumage. Val saw it fly in from the Gulf and land in one of the tall Sea Grapes near the helipad. I tried for photographs but the bird moved out of sight.

1

Adult male in the same Geiger Tree as the hummingbirds

1

We missed it yesterday but saw it today; I couldn't get photographs

1

Female; Bill only

© Bill Pranty

4

Minimum; 2 males and 2 females

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

1
6

1, 3, 1, and 1

2

Singles, the darkly-streaked bird from yesterday and one in more-typical basic plumage

© Bill Pranty

1

Presumably the same bird from yesterday

© Bill Pranty

© Bill Pranty

1

Not in my field notebook

© Bill Pranty

1

Bright blue male

 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes