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Checklist S44650893

 
Location
Timber Point Golf Course, Suffolk County, New York, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Mon Apr 16, 2018 6:15 PM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
4
Duration:
2 hour(s)
Distance:
0.3 mile(s)
Observers:
Patricia Lindsay List , Shai Mitra
Species
24 species total
2
Canada Goose
1
Northern Shoveler
2
Mallard
2
Double-crested Cormorant
2
Great Egret
2
Snowy Egret
2
Glossy Ibis
2
Osprey
1
Cooper's Hawk
15
Dunlin
7
Greater Yellowlegs
1
Willet

early; large Tringa with heavy bill and gray legs; ph.

5
Lesser Yellowlegs
1
Wood Sandpiper

***mega; ad alt; found by PJL; confirmed with SSM, BBo, TS; mob. Small Tringa resembling in various ways LEYE, SOSA, and SPSA. Compared to LEYE, it showed shorter legs, bill, and wingtips. The legs were furthermore greenish-yellow (rather than orange-yellow), and the face pattern was quite distinctive: a dark transocular bordered above by a broad, pale supercilium. The bird's habit of bobbing its body recalled that of the one prior WOSA we had seen, in Jamestown, RI, in October 2012. This adult in alternate plumage resembled that bird strongly in structure and face pattern, but differed in its coarsely patterned, blotchy gray and white dorsal plumage. During several short flights, we heard the bird's distinctive call ("chip-chip-chip") and saw its barred tail and contrasting white rump. The discovery and identification of this mega rarity was a team effort. I was seawatching at Robert Moses SP when Patricia called me to report an unfamiliar shorebird. Her puzzlement was my cue to race over to join her, along with my seawatching companions Brent Bomkamp and Taylor Sturm. We pulled up, predictably, just after the birds had flushed. While I spoke with Pat and reviewed some distant photos, Brent and Taylor set out to relocate the flock. As I came to the conclusion that it was likely a very rare Wood Sandpiper, they re-found the bird. We re-joined them and exhilaration ensued!

© Shai Mitra

© Shai Mitra

© Shai Mitra

© Shai Mitra

© Shai Mitra

15
Laughing Gull
20
Ring-billed Gull
10
Herring Gull
1
Great Black-backed Gull
2
Tree Swallow
3
American Robin
2
Northern Cardinal
5
Red-winged Blackbird
8
Common Grackle
20
Boat-tailed Grackle
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes