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Checklist S38837252

 
Location
Nanhui Dongtan (南汇东滩), Shanghai, CN ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sat Aug 26, 2017 5:49 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
2
Duration:
10 hour(s)
Distance:
30.0 kilometer(s)
Observers:
Craig Brelsford , Tom Hurley List
Comments:
Craig Brelsford with visiting U.S. birder Tom Hurley and a special cameo by 13-year-old teen phenom Jack Han.
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.5.149
Species
67 species (+3 other taxa) total
150
1
25
1
6
1
1

non-hepatic adult

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1

© Craig Brelsford

© Craig Brelsford (craigbrelsford.com, shanghaibirding.com). Lesser Cuckoo Cuculus poliocephalus, non-hepatic adult. 26 Aug. 2017. Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, China. Reasoning behind ID of Lesser Cuckoo: (1) No suggestion of brighter yellow iris that is characteristic of Eurasian Cuckoo as well as Oriental and Himalayan Cuckoo (darker iris more characteristic of Indian Cuckoo and Lesser Cuckoo) (2) Dark rump and uppertail coverts contrast little with dark tail, while dark tail and rump contrast markedly with paler back, all pointing to Lesser Cuckoo (3) On tail, very likely no subterminal black band (as in Indian Cuckoo), pointing again to Lesser Cuckoo

Age:
Adult

© Craig Brelsford

© Craig Brelsford (craigbrelsford.com, shanghaibirding.com). Lesser Cuckoo Cuculus poliocephalus, non-hepatic adult. 26 Aug. 2017. Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, China. Reasoning behind ID of Lesser Cuckoo: (1) No suggestion of brighter yellow iris that is characteristic of Eurasian Cuckoo as well as Oriental and Himalayan Cuckoo (darker iris more characteristic of Indian Cuckoo and Lesser Cuckoo) (2) Dark rump and uppertail coverts contrast little with dark tail, while dark tail and rump contrast markedly with paler back, all pointing to Lesser Cuckoo (3) On tail, very likely no subterminal black band (as in Indian Cuckoo), pointing again to Lesser Cuckoo

Age:
Adult
14
Cuculus sp.

adults and juveniles

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 4 4 6
3

Himalayan Swiftlet has sickle-shaped wings, shallowly forked tail, and generally greyish-brown color (paler underneath). The Himalayan Swiftlet we see in Shanghai are often around Barn Swallow. Often the first indicator of swiftlet I see is the sickle-shaped wings. Paying more attention, I discover that the swift soars more than the swallows. The swallows beat their wings more and seem to be scrambling to stay aloft, while the swiftlet slices through the air. Swallows are passeriforms, songbirds; swifts are apodiforms, non-passerines more closely related to caprimulgiforms (nightjars). Swallows and swifts independently became aerialists; their means of staying aloft are analogous to each other and not the result of evolution from a common aerialist ancestor.

© Craig Brelsford

© Craig Brelsford (craigbrelsford.com, shanghaibirding.com). Himalayan Swiftlet Aerodramus brevirostris. 26 Aug. 2017. Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229), Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, China. In photos, note sickle-shaped wings, shallowly forked tail, and generally greyish-brown color (paler underneath). Pale rump patch not visible in these photos. The Himalayan Swiftlet we see in Shanghai are often around Barn Swallow. Often the first indicator of swiftlet I see is the sickle-shaped wings. Paying more attention, I discover that the swift soars more than the swallows. The swallows beat their wings more and seem to be scrambling to stay aloft, while the swiftlet slices through the air. Swallows are passeriforms, songbirds; swifts are apodiforms, non-passerines more closely related to caprimulgiforms (nightjars). Swallows and swifts independently became aerialists; their means of staying aloft are analogous to each other and not the result of evolution from a common aerialist ancestor.

18
4
240
8

including 1 very pale individual

3
3
58
1
3
35
3
16
1

Craig Brelsford made a video of this Curlew Sandpiper: https://youtu.be/LEfTV7QSW_g

4
55
6
1
14
36
25
60
4
6
1
52
2
120
2
3
1
24
15
2

Craig Brelsford made a video of 1 of the 2 Chinese Egret noted today: https://youtu.be/0her8gpx48E

64
40
15
13
2
1
1
5
38
6

Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635) as well as other microforests

© Craig Brelsford

© Craig Brelsford (craigbrelsford.com, shanghaibirding.com). Japanese Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone atrocaudata. 26 Aug. 2017. Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, China.

© Craig Brelsford

© Craig Brelsford (craigbrelsford.com, shanghaibirding.com). Japanese Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone atrocaudata. 26 Aug. 2017. Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, China.

© Craig Brelsford

© Craig Brelsford (craigbrelsford.com, shanghaibirding.com). Japanese Paradise Flycatcher Terpsiphone atrocaudata. 26 Aug. 2017. Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, China.

150
8
4

Calling and hence distinguishable from similar Sakhalin Leaf Warbler. Round et al. say that the call of Pale-legged Leaf Warbler is distinguishable from that of Sakhalin Leaf Warbler: "[T]he call of P. tenellipes is markedly higher in frequency than that of P. borealoides (Weprincew et al. 1989, Yap et al. 2014)" (Round et al., "Addition of Kamchatka Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus examinandus and Sakhalin Leaf Warbler P. borealoides to Thailand's Avifauna," downloadable through shanghaibirding.com: http://www.shanghaibirding.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Round-et-al_Bull-Jpn-BBA_28_MS076.pdf)

2
Pale-legged/Sakhalin Leaf Warbler

Silent. Please note that aside from call and song there is no reliable field separator of Pale-legged and Sakhalin Leaf Warbler. For more, please see Craig Brelsford's post on shanghaibirding.com: "Separating Pale-legged & Sakhalin Leaf Warbler on Call" (http://www.shanghaibirding.com/2017/08/31/pale-sak-call/)

2
Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf Warbler
9
8
4
25
2
1
10

It's worth stressing how good is our opportunity here in Shanghai to view Siberian Blue Robin for a few short weeks each spring and fall. On the breeding grounds up in northern China, the males sing loudly and beautifully but are very hard to see; no Siberian Blue Robin I (Craig Brelsford) experienced on the breeding grounds ever sang from anything like an exposed perch. The few I was able to see in my wife Elaine Du's hometown of Boli, Heilongjiang sang on or near the ground. Females are almost impossible to see; in fact, I saw not one in Heilongjiang in May-June 2016. (See Craig and Elaine's report here: http://www.shanghaibirding.com/explorations/boli-may-june-2016/) Siberian Blue Robin are also apparently hard to see on their wintering grounds in S China and SE Asia. Places such as Cape Nanhui are probably among the best places in the world to view this common but shy species. We Shanghai birders have yet another reason to count ourselves lucky.

7
16
12
5
1
110
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes