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Checklist S35909280

 
Location
43.6866x-125.0005 - Apr 9, 2017, 9:43 AM, Douglas County, Oregon, US ( Map )
Date and Effort
Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:43 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
11
Duration:
1 hour(s)
Distance:
20.0 mile(s)
Observers:
Barbara L. Carlson List , Hugh David Fleischmann List , Jeff Shenot List , Justin Bosler List , Scott and Linda Terrill , johnny powell List
Comments:
N/A
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.4.114
Species
15 species total
5
2
1
2
11
1
12
2

Many obs. Regular in these waters in April.

28
12
2
15
5

15 or so observers saw a number of Murphy’s Petrels off the central and northern California and Oregon coasts, where they occur regularly at this time of year, during a Princess Cruises cruise from Los Angeles to Vancouver on April 8 and 9, 2017. Observers included individuals with a great deal of offshore seabird experience, including several decades with this species. Most of the birds were observed over the shelf break, with some as deep as 2000+ fathoms. These birds were often initially identified by their structure and flight style, and then confirmed as they became close enough to the boat to confirm the identification as Murphy’s Petrels. Structurally, they differed from Ardenna shearwaters in their narrow and pointed wings, typically held with a conspicuous “crook” or bow at the bend in the wing, unlike the straighter wings of shearwaters. The structure and wing loading of these birds enable them to very efficiently use high winds, and most of the birds were first detected flying in very high arcs and dips with little or no wing flapping during the observation. Shearwaters and Northern Fulmars also arc in high winds, but not as persistently and they typically flap the wings a great deal more than do Pterodroma petrels. These birds typically looked blackish or dark gray at a distance, but had a distinct shape and posture. In cases where birds were recorded as Murphy’s Petrels, plumage aspects were typically seen as well, and some, if not many, approached the boat relatively closely. On these birds, although there was variation in plumage wear, the indication of an “M” pattern was visible on the upperparts and a white sheen was often visible at the base of the underside of the primaries. Both of these features were visible, but often subtle. The white at the base of the bill and chin was visible on the closest birds, as was the thicker bill relative to shearwaters. The tail appeared relatively slender and tapered when closed, and somewhat wedge shaped when open. A number of birds were photographed by observers and some of these photos may be added to some of the numerous eBird checklists generated over the two-day period using the eBird pelagic protocol.

1
25
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes