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Checklist S33476105

 
Location
Caballo Lake SP--Percha Recreation Area, Sierra County, New Mexico, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Thu Jan 05, 2017 9:30 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
3
Duration:
4 hour(s)
Distance:
0.5 kilometer(s)
Observers:
Curtis Marantz
Species
42 species (+7 other taxa) total
40
Canada Goose

(calling)

4
Cackling/Canada Goose

(I saw among the flock of geese that flew by shortly after we arrived what appeared to be about four smaller birds that I suspect represented Cackling Geese, but I never saw these birds all that well)

2
Common Merganser

(female-plumaged birds flushed from along the river)

2
Eurasian Collared-Dove

(singing)

2
White-winged Dove

(i saw one of two birds that were perched along the river)

2
Mourning Dove

(sen together as they flew overhead)

1
Greater Roadrunner

(I missed a bvird that was seen by Jim)

35
Sandhill Crane

(calling; I saw a flock of eight birds and later a flock of about 25 cranes, but a few others were only heard)

2
Killdeer

(calling; flushed along the river)

5
Larus sp.

(calling; we once heard a gull calling and I saw several Larus passing high overhead and not identifiable to species)

1
Great Egret

(seen as ti flew by relatively high overhead)

1
Northern Harrier

(juvenile)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1
1
Belted Kingfisher

(calling; I clearly saw a female but at one point I thought I may have heard two birds calling at one time)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female 1
Sex Unknown
2
Ladder-backed Woodpecker

(calling; I heard "pik" calls and saw a female,m but Jim also saw a male, both along the river opposite the campground)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female 1
Sex Unknown
2
Northern Flicker

(calling; I heard "kleer" calls by at least two unseen birds and once saw a bird fly by that I could not identify with confidence to subspecies-group)

1
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)

(I saw clearly a female that was on the bank of the river)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female 1
Sex Unknown
1
American Kestrel

(calling; I saw a female and heard what may or may not have been this same bird)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female 1
Sex Unknown
1
Prairie Falcon

(flushed from trees along the river and seen relatively well as it flew off)

3
Black Phoebe

(calling; I saw only one of several phoebes that Jim saw along the river)

2
Chihuahuan Raven

(calling; I heard a couple of ravens that sounded a bit odd relative to Common Ravens that I hear)

20
raven sp.

(we saw quite a few ravens as they flew overhead, and my understanding is that most of the ravens in this area are Chihuahuan, but I could not really identify any of these birds with much confidence)

2
Verdin

(calling)

1
House Wren

(calling; I heard scold calls by an unseen bird)

1
Carolina Wren

(singing and calling; we heard several songs given by an unseen bird shortly after we arrived and more briefly later in our visit, and I also heard a loud chatter that sounded like a common call by this species; we heard this bird on both sides of the river opposite the campground and Jim may have seen it fly across this river in this same area; the song was the loud "tea-kettle, tea-kettle, etc. that is most unlike any other species that occurs in this area and given by a bird that has apparently been present at this site for some time)

1
Bewick's Wren

(I missed a bird that was seen by Jim)

3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet

(calling; I heard and saw three or maybe four kinglets)

12
Western Bluebird

(calling; I noted seeing at least three males and two females before numbers reached a point that I stopped keeping track of the sexes separately; moreover,m this is an estimate given that the bluebirds were moving around widely)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 3
Female 2
Sex Unknown 7
5
European Starling

(calling)

1
American Pipit

(calling; I once heard an unseen bird calling as ti flew overhead)

5
Phainopepla

(calling; the only bird that I saw was a male)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female
Sex Unknown 4
40
House Finch

(calling; we spent quite a long time checking the finches along the river opposite the campground where Jerry had seen the continuing Purple Finch)

1
Purple Finch

(despite our expending much effort, Jim and I missed altogether the continuing adult male Purple Finch that Jerry saw twice along the river opposite the campground; this bird was apparently found on 30 December 2016 by Brandon Percival)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female
Sex Unknown
4
American Goldfinch

(calling; including two seen together coming to water at the edge of the river opposite the campground)

15
Chipping Sparrow

(calling)

10
Dark-eyed Junco

(calling)

10
Dark-eyed Junco (Pink-sided)

(calling; the birds that I saw clearly each represented J. h. mearnsi, but I only heard or saw too poorly to identify to subspecies about half of the juncos)

3
White-crowned Sparrow

(several of the estimated 12 White-crowned Sparrows that I saw were seen too poorly to identify to subspecies)

1
White-crowned Sparrow (Dark-lored)

(one of the birds that I saw well had the black lores and black-and-white crown stripes of either Z. l. orantha or Z. l. leucophrys; I also noted an orange bill on this bird, gray underparts, and back and wing patterns much like those of the adult Z. l. gambelii)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1
8
White-crowned Sparrow (Gambel's)

(with one exception, all of the birds that I saw well enough to identify to subspecies represented Z> l. gambelii)

1
Golden-crowned Sparrow

While searching for the Harris’s Sparrow, I twice saw this bird among a large flock of White-crowned and Chipping Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos in dense thickets of undergrowth bordering the fields to the west about 200 meters below the parking area. Both of my views were relatively brief (especially the initial encounter). Moreover, this bird was largely obscured by a White-crowned Sparrow for a large portion of my second encounter, yet it was completely unobstructed when the other bird flew off.
This was a medium-sized sparrow that appeared similar in size and shape to the White-crowned Sparrows that I saw in direct comparison. It had a conical bill that tapered from a heavy base to a pointed tip along a straight culmen, a gently sloping forehead and a weakly rounded crown on a head of unremarkable size for a Zonotrichia. The neck was relatively short and inconspicuous, and the body was plump, full-chested, and with a posture that was more upright than horizontal yet not quite diagonal when perched in the upper branches of the generally leafless shrubs. I noted a long and relatively slim tail, but I failed altogether to notice the primary projection, placement of the wingtips relative to the tail, the shape at the tip of the tail, and essentially everything about the legs and feet.
This bird was generally brown in coloration, and although I cannot now recall much on the way of detail about the pattern on the upperparts and wings, I was quite confident that the face was a medium to dark brown color and with minimal pattern. I did notice some yellow color at the junction of the supraloral region and forehead and a darker crown, but this bird seemed to lack any obvious suggestion of an eyeline, supercilium, or malar stripe. I also thought the underparts were more brownish than those of the White-crowned Sparrows. My recollection is not quite as clear for the upperparts and wings, but I am confident this bird had dark streaks on the back and a wing pattern that combined paler wingbars and warm edges to the remiges to produce a striped pattern on the rear part of the wing. I noted only that the tail was dark.
I noted quite clearly in the field that the bill was a medium to dark gray in color and possibly with a darker culmen. I was moderately certain the eyes were dark, but I cannot now recall noting the colors of the legs or feet.

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1
2
Harris's Sparrow

I twice saw the continuing adult Harris’s Sparrow while searching through the sparrow flock that was along the border between the riparian corridor and the fields to the west about 300 meters south of the trailhead. I first saw this bird as it perched briefly with other sparrows in the leafless shrubs at the upper edge of the bank, and later, with Jim’s help, I saw it again foraging just inside the dense vegetation along the edge of the field. Both times my views of this bird were relatively good through my scope, but both encounters were relatively brief, involving a bird that was partly obscured by vegetation, and I was unable to get any photos. Moreover, I missed altogether a second, also continuing immature that was in this same flock.
This bird was similar in size and shape to the White-crowned Sparrows with which it was associated and although it may have been slightly larger, I could not be completely certain. I did notice that this bird had a conical bill that tapered from a deep base to a pointed tip along a culmen that was at least relatively straight. The crown was gently rounded, but I failed to really notice the shape of the forehead. The neck was short and inconspicuous and the body was plump and full-chested, and with a posture that was slightly more upright than horizontal. I failed to notice the primary projection, the placement of the wingtips relative to the tail, or the length of the tail relative to the body, yet I thought the tail was relatively long, slim, and parallel-sided. I also failed to notice anything about the legs or feet.
This was a boldly marked bird yet my views were sufficiently brief that I was unable to notice various characters. The throat was solidly black from the chin down to the breast and apparently out to the malar region, but I had a hard time seeing if the breast or flanks were marked on what were at least mostly whitish underparts. The face was a deep cinnamon-buff with at least some suggestion of a postocular stripe or dark frame to the auriculars. I am pretty sure the forehead was extensively black, but I cannot now recall the degree to which it had paler speckling and I cannot recall the color of the crown even though I do recall noting two diffuse bands of brown extending down the back of the neck separated by a paler and equally diffuse stripe in the middle. The back and scapulars were sandy-brown with dark streaking and the wings combined dark-centered coverts that had pale buff tips to produce two narrow wingbars across the greater and median coverts. I am less sure that there were narrow bands between the wingbars, yet I noted clearly that the remiges had deep cinnamon edges that contrasted with dark centers to produce a striped pattern on the rear part of the wing. I cannot now recall noting the primary projection or the pattern on the exposed secondaries, but I am relatively certain that I never saw the rump and I noted only that the upperside of the tail appeared to be dark.
The bill was a deep orange color and the eyes were dark, but I was unable to discern their color, and I cannot recall noting the color of the legs or feet.

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1 1
1
White-throated Sparrow

(an adult, white-striped bird along the east bank of the river opposite the campground)

10
Savannah Sparrow (Savannah)
1
Song Sparrow

(calling; heard-only)

1
Lincoln's Sparrow

(calling; heard-only)

1
Spotted Towhee

(i saw this bird only briefly and not well enough to determine its sex)

2
Western Meadowlark

(singing and calling; heard-only)

6
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's)

(calling)

2
Pyrrhuloxia

(calling; I saw both an adult male and a female0

 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes