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Checklist S31487800

 
Location
Amado WTP, Pima County, Arizona, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Wed Sep 07, 2016 2:58 PM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
1
Duration:
2 hour(s), 35 minute(s)
Distance:
0.05 mile(s)
Observers:
Laurens Halsey
Species
20 species (+3 other taxa) total
32

Coming & going, best guess estimate

4
Mallard/Mexican Duck
1
4
2
3
1
4

See checklist comments for situational details. At least four of storm-petrels showed significant white rumps and from my observations in the field and analysis of all the photos I so far scrutinized, they were all the same species. In the field, while observing & photographing the birds I & others were thinking we we dealing with one of the leach's-type (recently split - Leach's/Townsend's/Ainley's). Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel was eventually mentioned and now the consensus of experts that have reviewed the photos is that these are Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels. Also many of the other white-rumped storm-petrels found in the region this day, Patagonia Lake and various individuals observed/picked up around Tucson/Green Valley/Nogales? are Wedge-rumped.
Details: In general - dark plumaged storm-petrel with significant white rump. Specifically - body plumage & coverts blackish with slight brownish tone, fairly distinct pale brownish bar on upper surface of wings (greater secondary coverts & inner primary covers), did not appear to reach the leading edge of wings, there appeared to be a matching pale bar on the underwing however lighting & viewing conditions made it impossible to tell for sure, most significant feature was the large white triangular rump patch (upper-tail coverts) which covered three-quarters or more of the tail but did not reach the notch in the tail as some references alluded to, at least the outer (lateral) under-tail coverts also appeared white or whitish, again conditions inhibited ability to determine whether white rapped all the way around the tail. Apparently these were small storm-petrels as there was little or no size difference between these individuals and the presumed Least Storm-Petrel.

© Laurens Halsey

© Laurens Halsey

© Laurens Halsey

© Laurens Halsey

1

See checklist comments for situational details. Detail: Small appearing, all dark blackish-brown storm-petrel with paler bar on upper-wing, and wedge shaped tail.

© Laurens Halsey

© Laurens Halsey

© Laurens Halsey

1

Initially observed this bird flying/gliding in from the south about 500 yards, flying northward at 15:10 MDT. It was one of those scan the sky observations because your in the middle of a storm kind of things. Initial impression was a booby but quickly changed to some sort of shearwater. Did not observe bird with binoculars. Camera was already in hands as I was taking photographs of the storm-petrels immediately in front of me. As the bird approached the pond, it began turning left & right as if interested or investigating, cirled the pond once or twice, then veered off towards the west. I ripped off 67 photos in less than a minute while the bird was over & near the pond. There is no significant bodies of water to the west except Arivaca Lake 18 miles to the southwest. Did not attempt to identify the bird until later, from photos. My initial conclusion was Pink-footed. Sent a photo to others (David Vander Pluym & Lauren Harter) and the immediate response was Wedge-tailed Shearwater. This ID was collaborated by several others (Oscar Johnson & Debie Shearwater) much more familiar with pelagics once the photo was posted to Facebook .

© Laurens Halsey

© Laurens Halsey

© Laurens Halsey

1
1
2
yellow-bellied kingbird sp.
8
1
8
8
6
28
3
2
4
200
blackbird sp.

Large flock

 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes