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Checklist S30606243

 
Location
Fort De Soto Park, Pinellas County, Florida, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sun Oct 31, 2004 9:00 AM
Protocol:
Historical
Party Size:
1
Duration:
4 hour(s)
Distance:
5.0 mile(s)
Observers:
fide R.Smith
Comments:
Information listed here is from a field card provided by Lyn Atherton (fide R.Smith)
Species
22 species (+1 other taxa) total
1
Northern Harrier

female

1
Cooper's Hawk
1
Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher (Western Flycatcher)

One well-photographed within the "Western" flycatcher complex (Pacific-sloped/Cordilleran).

Lyn's discussion: "I went ahead and edited the second image of the WEFL in ventral view, since the head was at a slightly different angle. I was able to get photos of this empid ventrally, because the color pattern of the feathering eliminates virtually all other NA empids except possibly Yellow-bellied, although that species usually shows a stronger vested pattern—formed by greenish-olive feathering and the yellowish color of the belly projecting up into the breast. This particular WEFL shows the brownish-olive color dorsally that is typical of WEFL vs the more greenish-olive tone of Yellow-bellied. The head is peaked in all photos, classic WEFL, vs rounded in Yellow-bellied. The very prominent eye-ring with tear-drop projection distally and almost obsolete above the eye is classic WEFL. The eye-ring of Yellow-bellied is usually complete and even around the eye, although some do show just a hint of tear-drop posteriorly. The lower mandible of this WEFL is pinkish-colored unlike the apparently always orange-yellow lower mandible of Yellow-bellied (according to Whitney and Kaufman, Birding,Vol XVIII, No 6, "The Empidonax Challenge"). The wings are "dusky" typical of WEFL vs the very blackish tone of Yellow-bellied's wings. The tail is relatively long vs the relatively short tail of Yellow-bellied.

When photos sent and reviewed by Michael Brothers, he mentioned the uneven spacing of the outer primaries typical of WEFL vs the even outer primary spacing of Yellow-bellied, which is supposed to be definitive in separating the two species. These are enough field marks to confirm the ID as WEFL. Based on the timing of the occurrence, I suspect this empid was a Pacific-slope Flycatcher, but without a recording of its call, I think we'll have to just be happy to get it accepted as WEFL.."

© fide R.Smith

© fide R.Smith

© fide R.Smith

© fide R.Smith

© fide R.Smith

4
Eastern Phoebe
1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Photographed

1
White-eyed Vireo
1
Clay-colored Sparrow

Photographed

2
Ovenbird
2
Black-and-white Warbler
3
Tennessee Warbler
3
Common Yellowthroat
1
Hooded Warbler

female

1
American Redstart
1
Northern Parula

Photographed

1
Magnolia Warbler
1
Bay-breasted Warbler

Photographed

2
Black-throated Blue Warbler

ma & fe

17
Palm Warbler
1
Pine Warbler

female photographed

12
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
3
Yellow-throated Warbler
1
Prairie Warbler

Male photographed

4
Indigo Bunting
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes