Checklist S30086632

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Owner David Bell

Other participating eBirders
Traveling
  • 3
  • 1.5 mi
Comments

Luke Tiller, Catherine Hamilton and Dave Bell>Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.1.5 Build 44

Observations

  1. Number observed: 6
  2. Number observed: 10
  3. Number observed: 5
  4. Number observed: 8
  5. Number observed: 5
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. Number observed: 1
  8. hummingbird sp.

    Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 3
  10. Number observed: 5
  11. Number observed: 1
  12. Number observed: 2
  13. Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 6
  15. Number observed: 1
  16. Number observed: 2
  17. Number observed: 3
  18. Number observed: 5
  19. Number observed: 5
  20. Alder/Willow Flycatcher (Traill's Flycatcher)

    Number observed: 1

    Comments: Candidate for Alder Flycatcher.

    I found this bird along the long row of bamboo grass south of the road bordering the large dirt field.

    I was stunned to hear a perfect feeBEEo call twice. The call clearly had three syllables with rough burry quality on the first and second notes and a higher ending note. I checked reference recordings for both species (from the Sibley app) to refresh my memory and felt certain it was a identical match for typical Alder call. My only concern at the time (other than extreme rarity) was whether Willow can make this same call. I still don't know but now having listened to a lot of calls on xeno-canto I still feel confident that it was most likely Alder.

    I called over Luke and Catherine and checked with a couple of friends to see if they were at Galileo (they weren't). What was presumably the same bird was viewed off and on but silent for the next 20-30 minutes after that. Visually the bird was indistinguishable to my eye from a typical Willow but did show a distinct although narrow off-white eyering. We tried playing both Willow and Alder calls to the bird but got little response for either species and the bird remained silent. The bird was alone.

    About 30 minutes later I returned to look again and there were about 5 Willlow Flycathers in this same area plus a couple of Pacific-slopes. I tried recording a bunch of interaction calls between the Willow-type Flycatchers in the same area. I have now reviewed those recordings and they do not include any feeBEEo type calls.

    Although I feel confident that the bird I heard made a dead-on match for a Alder Flycatcher call, given the rarity of that species I don't feel that I can call this an Alder without recordings. It got away. Others in the area in the next day or two may want to keep your eyes and ears out for it.

  21. Number observed: 2
  22. Number observed: 4
  23. Number observed: 2
  24. Number observed: 1
  25. Number observed: 5
  26. Number observed: 10
  27. Number observed: 1
  28. Number observed: 25
  29. Number observed: 50
  30. Number observed: 5
  31. Number observed: 2
  32. Number observed: 2
  33. Number observed: 1

    Comments: Photos. Pale gray lores. Pink bill.

    Media:
  34. Number observed: 20

    Comments: Among the most common species here today. All of the birds I observed were juveniles.

  35. Number observed: 5
  36. Number observed: 1
  37. Number observed: 50
  38. Number observed: 1
  39. Number observed: 25
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