Checklist S29545941

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Owner Curtis Marantz

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Area
  • 2
Additional fields
Area: 80.0 ha

Observations

  1. Number observed: 10

    Comments: (calling; I noted seeing two pairs and an additional male around Lake Tamarisk, and four males and a female at the fish ponds)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 7
    Female 3
    Sex Unknown
  2. Mallard (Domestic type)

    Number observed: 1

    Comments: (a hen seen with a normal-looking drake around Lake Tamarisk took flight shortly after we saw it; this bird was a pale buff color overall and perhaps a bit on the "heavy" side, but not as large as a Buff Orpington though perhaps a similar breed)

  3. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (I missed altogether a male that Louis saw diving on the large fish pond, and on which he noted a bold and clean white cheek)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female
    Sex Unknown
  4. Number observed: 6

    Comments: (we saw one bird on Lake Tamarisk, another on the sewage ponds, and four more on the fish ponds; all were in either alternate or transitional plumage)

  5. Number observed: 75

    Comments: (singing and calling; this total represents a rough estimate)

  6. Number observed: 8

    Comments: (singing; we counted at least eight birds; there could have been some overlap, but I did see four birds perched together at one point)

  7. Number observed: 5

    Comments: (this is actually a good total by recent standards)

  8. Number observed: 2

    Comments: (calling; I only heard this species today, but Louis saw a female hovering outside the crown of a small tree and snapping at small flying insects (pale, gnat-like things), before capturing several and then dashing back into the tree)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male
    Female 1
    Sex Unknown 1
  9. Number observed: 4

    Comments: (calling; we saw all four and all appeared to be females)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male
    Female 4
    Sex Unknown
  10. hummingbird sp.

    Number observed: 2

    Comments: (two additional hummingbirds that we only glimpsed were likely either Anna's or Costa's Hummingbirds, but I suppose Black-chinned is also a possibility)

  11. Number observed: 15

    Comments: (I counted nine coots on Lake Tamarisk and five more on the fish ponds, so quite a few than had been present here a few weeks ago)

  12. Number observed: 10

    Comments: (the stilts were all seen around the sewage ponds)

  13. Number observed: 4

    Comments: (calling; all four avocets were seen at the sewage ponds, including one that was seen sitting down on the slope, and thus an unlikely nest site)

  14. Number observed: 2

    Comments: (calling; we saw one in the neighborhood just west of Lake Tamarisk and another that was at the fish ponds)

  15. Number observed: 1

    Comments: I heard but initially missed this bird when Louis first saw it in the western part of the golf course in the morning, but we both again heard it and saw the curlew quite well as it foraged in the southern part of the course later in the day. The call given was a loud, "cur-leeeu" that is typical of this species.
    This was a large shorebird with a notably long bill that was smoothly decurved along about the distal half of its length, a small head but also a relatively long and conspicuously slim neck, and a plump body, relatively short wings and tail, and moderately long legs. We saw no other birds in direct comparison with the curlew, yet my impression was that this bird was both somewhat larger overall and with a longer bill than a Whimbrel.
    This bird was a warm cinnamon-buff color almost throughout the plumage but the head was at most weakly marked and without obvious stripes, the underparts were at most weakly streaked, and the back and scapulars were spangled with black whereas the wing coverts were paler and more buffy than the rest of the wing, seemingly a bit worn, and with darker shaft-streaks but not much additional pattern. I have only a vague recollection that the tertials were barred, but I suppose this should be shown clearly in our photos. The bill was mostly dark but with the lower mandible pinkish basally, the eyes were dark, and the legs were dark but I failed to notice their color
    See also a separate description of this bird in shared list by Louis.

    Media:
  16. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (a lone bird in alternate plumage at the sewage ponds)

  17. Number observed: 5

    Comments: (calling; as I recall, we saw three at the pond in the southeastern part of the golf course and two more at the fish ponds; all were in alternate plumage)

  18. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (a bird in alternate plumage seen at the sewage ponds)

  19. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (we flushed this bird from the fish ponds and saw it fly east over desert before circling north)

  20. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (foraging along the southeastern shore of the Lake Tamarisk)

  21. Number observed: 2

    Comments: (seen together as they flushed and flew over western part of Lake Tamarisk)

  22. Number observed: 15

    Comments: (calling; most of the night-herons appeared to be adults, but we did see one second-cycle bird and at least one juvenile; we could also hear young begging in presumed nests located in the pines off the southwestern corner of the southern lake)

    Breeding Code: NY Nest with Young (Confirmed)
  23. Number observed: 8

    Comments: (I saw no more than two vultures at a time, but Louis saw six in one sweep, with some working distant areas of desert north and east, but most coursing back and forth over the vicinity of Lake Tamarisk; it was therefore difficult to know how many were really present, but eight birds should be considered a minimum total)

  24. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (calling; a male that we saw clearly as it flew and perched along the western side of southern part of the lake)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female
    Sex Unknown
    Media:
  25. Number observed: 3

    Comments: (calling; we heard both "pik" and rattle calls, and saw together in the southeastern part of the property a male with juvenile; the third bird was in the northwestern part of the site and seen only in flight, but Louis thought it was a female)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female 1
    Sex Unknown 1
    Media:
  26. Number observed: 3

    Comments: (we saw two females at different sites on the golf course and a young male over the fish ponds)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female 2
    Sex Unknown
  27. Number observed: 8

    Comments: (calling; I counted these birds individually)

  28. Number observed: 2

    Comments: Given the photos and the description below for the first bird by Louis, I did not write a description of this bird despite my studying it closely. I can however note that the bird at the fish ponds, which we saw foraging by sallying out from the tamarisk trees low over the water, was seen at moderate distance, yet clearly and Empidonax with brownish-olive upperparts, no apparent eyering but a weakly peaked head, and dull wingbars on wings that were darker than the upperparts. This bird also had a whitish throat and a cream-colored belly, but the breast was clouded a little darker. I was also at least moderately confident that I saw a pale lower-mandible on this bird, which despite being silent and not seen quite as well as the better-documented bird, appeared to be similar in its behavior, size, structure, and plumage patterns and coloration.

    One was along the oleander line at north edge and seen foraging, mostly below eye-level, into flowering Ironwood (Olneya tesota) on desert side. The other was foraging low along a line of tamarisk trees bordering the interior island of the eastern 'fish' pond. The first bird was giving a strong whit and gave a few snatches of 'fitz-bew' song (photos and recording of call). Both of these birds were large, heavy-billed Empidonax with short primary projection, dull wingbars, no or only faint very thin pale eyering, olive-brown upperparts, white chin and throat with pale yellowish underparts. The mandible was entirely pale, dull yellowish to orangish yellow. The underwing marginal coverts were brighter yellow and showed at the bend of the wing (seen on first bird). The legs were blackish; the irides were dark brown. First bird seen to capture a bee in the Ironwood.

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  29. Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher (Western Flycatcher)

    Number observed: 2

    Comments: (both were silent, but well seen)

  30. Number observed: 6

    Comments: (calling; like most of the species seen today, we counted these birds individually)

  31. Number observed: 6

    Comments: (calling; only six kingbirds at this site in early May is a lower than expected total)

  32. Number observed: 5

    Comments: (I saw only one raven, but Louis saw four in one pass of scanning across the desert)

  33. Number observed: 20

    Comments: (calling; we tried to count the Verdins individually and I noted seeing at least two juveniles, one of which Louis saw begging and being fed by an adult)

    Breeding Code: FY Feeding Young (Confirmed)
    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male
    Female
    Sex Unknown 2 8 10
    Media:
  34. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (I did not see this bird all that well, but it appeared to be relatively large, bulky, and brown-backed)

  35. Number observed: 2
  36. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (calling; we saw a lone juvenile as it foraged in flowering Ironwood (Olneya tesota) off the northwestern corner of the golf course; the calls heard represented a drawn-out "cheee" with some harshness but more similar to the calls of Blue-gray Gnatcatcher than is typical of calls by adults; Louis glimpsed the underside of the rectrices and noted only a white outer-border, but I did not see the bird this well)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male
    Female
    Sex Unknown 1
    Media:
  37. Number observed: 25

    Comments: (this is no more than a rough estimate given that these birds moved around the site extensively)

  38. Number observed: 4

    Comments: (singing; we saw what appeared to reprsent two pairs of mockingbirds)

  39. Number observed: 2

    Comments: (calling; Louis saw both birds well and we heard at least one giving 'quit' calls; Louis noted that the upperparts were warm, even grayish-brown, and unlike the dull, olive-gray of eastern birds, suggesting that both represented nominate C. ustulatus)

  40. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (calling; I saw one waxwing clearly as it perched atop the large mesquite trees in the yard of the most southwestern home on the property, but I thought I was hearing two birds at the time and thus would consider the total to be one or possibly two birds)

  41. Number observed: 6

    Comments: (calling; I recorded seeing two males and female, but the others were unseen)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 2
    Female 1
    Sex Unknown 3
  42. Number observed: 10

    Comments: (singing and calling)

  43. Number observed: 3

    Comments: (calling; we heard and glimpsed one bird flying overhead while near the "Sandbox," but I later saw two birds perched overhead in a tree near the northwestern corner of the southern lake for a likely total of thee siskins)

    Media:
  44. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (calling; a bird in alternate plumage in trees of yards located off the north end of Catalina Way was starting to get a bit late for this site)

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  45. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (Louis spotted this bird in the mesquite tree in the most southwestern yard on the property)

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  46. Number observed: 4

    Comments: (I saw only one of the four meadowlarks that we encountered today)

  47. Number observed: 7

    Comments: (calling; I noted hearing both "wink" and chatter calls and seeing one adult male, two immature males, and four females)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 2 1
    Female 4
    Sex Unknown
  48. Number observed: 5

    Comments: (singing and calling; I recorded seeing two adult males, two females, and one young male)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1 2
    Female 2
    Sex Unknown
  49. Number observed: 1

    Comments: I spotted this bird foraging quietly in a flowering Ironwood tree (Olneya tesota) just outside the eastern wall of the mobile home park, where it remained for a few minutes before flying off into the desert to the northeast and disappearing. Although this bird continued to forage in the tree for several minutes, I concentrated on getting at least a few photos rather than studying it carefully. I was therefore able to get several photos, and Louis was able to get a few others, yet I failed to study this bird in extensive detail, so my description of it is necessarily somewhat superficial. The suite of behaviors that we noted from this bird was limited to its hopping about the tree and foraging on the flowers, and we never did hear it vocalize.
    This was a small to medium-sized passerine that I would have estimated to be somewhat larger than a sparrow yet smaller than a mockingbird. I noted quite clearly that its bill tapered from a base of some depth to a finely pointed tip, and that it had a head of unremarkable size with a gently yet smoothly rounded crown. The neck appeared to be relatively short and inconspicuous, and the body was plump and seemingly full-chested. I failed altogether to note the primary projection or even the length of the wings, but I could see that the tail was of medium-length and that it was parallel-sided. I cannot now recall much of anything about the legs or feet.
    This was a brightly colored and strikingly patterned bird that was obviously an adult male Baltimore Oriole. Immediately conspicuous was the striking contrast between the jet-black of the entire head, neck, and back with the intense, day-glow orange of the breast, belly, sides, and flanks. I cannot recall noting specifically the color of the undertail coverts or really even the underside of the tail. I was able to see that the back was entirely and solidly black, and that the wings were mostly black, but also with two wingbars that were white in color. Also evident, at least at times, was what appeared to be an orange wedge near the shoulder, but I was unable to determine on what feather tract this color was located. I saw somewhat less clearly additional fringing on the remiges that gave the distal part of the wing a striped pattern, but I am having a hard time remembering the coloration of these fringes. I did notice at one point when the bird spread its tail somewhat that the blackish central-feathers contrasted with bright orange on at least the distal parts of the outer feathers. I cannot however recall noting the color of the rump.
    I have a reasonably good recollection that the eyes were dark, and thus not contrasting with the black hood, but I am now having a difficult time remembering the colors of the bill, legs, or feet.

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female
    Sex Unknown
    Media:
  50. Number observed: 1

    Comments: We saw this bird initially in flight before it perched briefly atop a mesquite tree in a yard along the north side of the lake. Moreover, I tried to get some photos of the bird, which I saw only at moderate distance and in less than ideal light. I was therefore able to note this bird's size and stocky structure that combined a large head with a somewhat flat-crowned appearance and a stocky neck, a plump body, and a tail that was shorter than those of most blackbirds. I am also confident that I noted a stout-based bill that tapered to a pointed tip. Unlike Louis, I noted no gloss in this bird's plumage, which to me appeared uniformly black given the backlit conditions, and I also could not quite make out the red eyes in the field even though they were shown in my photos. The bill appeared to be black, but I cannot recall noting the color of the legs or feet.

    The description below was written by Louis

    Adult male first seen in flight as a heavy-bodied, short-tailed cowbird-shaped blackbird that we suspected was this species. It perched at the top of a mesquite and we could see the large conical bill, heavy and puffed out neck (bulging at hindneck changed with posture), glossy black plumage, red eyes. There was some bluish gloss to parts of this birds wings, but rump color was not seen.

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female
    Sex Unknown
    Media:
  51. Number observed: 7

    Comments: (I coutned four males and three females foraging together on lawns)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 4
    Female 3
    Sex Unknown
  52. Number observed: 40

    Comments: (singing and calling; I find it almost impossible to count the grackles at this site, so this is an estimate)

  53. Number observed: 1

    Comments: (a female seen foraging on the ground and low in the oleanders along the southern edge of the golf course)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male
    Female 1
    Sex Unknown
  54. Number observed: 2

    Comments: (calling; I saw an adult male clearly, but I only glimpsed a female that was seen better by Louis)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female 1
    Sex Unknown
  55. Number observed: 6

    Comments: (calling; I noted seeing an adult male and what appeared to be a young male, but most of these birds were only glimpsed or heard as they flew overhead)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 2
    Female
    Sex Unknown 4
  56. Number observed: 8

    Comments: (calling; we did our best to count these birds individually and I recorded seeing four females and three males, but I missed the last bird; all were clearly "Audubon's" Warblers)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 3
    Female 4
    Sex Unknown 1
    Media:
  57. Number observed: 55

    Comments: (calling; we tried to count these birds individually around Lake Tamarisk, but to this total we estimated seeing 25 birds in the tamarisk trees bordering the fish ponds)

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  58. Number observed: 2

    Comments: (I managed to miss both the male and female tanagers that were seen by Louis)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female 1
    Sex Unknown
  59. Number observed: 2

    Comments: (singing and calling; we heard both sharp, 'bik' calls and a short bout of song from a male in the most southwestern yard on the property and later saw a female in the southeastern neighborhood)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 1
    Female 1
    Sex Unknown
  60. Number observed: 6

    Comments: (we saw three males and a female foraging on the ground along the southern edge of the golf course, another female along the western edge, and a third female along the northern edge of the golf course)

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male 2 1
    Female 3
    Sex Unknown
  61. Lazuli/Indigo Bunting

    Number observed: 2

    Comments: (calling; I heard "buzz" calls by two unseen buntings, one or more of which Louis noted to be poorly seen females)

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