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Checklist S27990534

 
Location
Sabine Woods (UTC 026), Jefferson County, Texas, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sun May 14, 1995
Protocol:
Historical
Party Size:
1
Distance:
0.0 mile(s)
Area: 0.0 ac
Observers:
John Whittle
Comments:
N/A
Species
25 species total
3
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
2
Mourning Dove
1
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
4
Laughing Gull
1
Least Bittern
2
Snowy Egret
2
Tricolored Heron
1
Green Heron
1
Sharp-shinned Hawk
3
Downy Woodpecker
1
Least Flycatcher
5
Eastern Kingbird
1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
2
Purple Martin
1
Carolina Chickadee
1
Swainson's Thrush
3
Gray Catbird
3
Northern Mockingbird
10
Cedar Waxwing
1
Hooded Oriole

Sabine Woods (TOS), Jefferson County, Texas - 8:00 am Length of sighting: one minute Habitat: coastal oak motte in coastal marsh, with extensive underbrush around edges Weather: Cloudy, warm, south wind 10-15 mph Light Conditions: Very good Distance: 15 feet and up Optical equipment: 7x35 mm binoculars Voice/call notes: None heard The bird flushed from the low underbrush immediately due north of the entrance "gate" and flew to near the top of one of the oaks at the entrance. The bird remained there for about a minute, extending its wings several times, and then flew off back into the low brush. - Typical Oriole shape and size, giving the impression of a Baltimore Oriole on quick sight as it flew away. The basic color of the bird was a flaming orange, with a black throat, upper breast and lores, extending very slightly onto the forehead. The back was jet black, sharply contrasting with the orange nape. The rump was orange. The tail was all dark black, without orange or yellow edges. The wings (perched) were dark black, with a very bright white upper wing bar, and traces of a white lower wing bar. Bill: Not excessively long, fairly thin, and curved uniformly throughout its length. Legs: Not visible. ELIMINATION OF SIMILAR SPECIES: There was a singing first-year-male Orchard Oriole nearby. It was a dingy yellow, and clearly had a light gray back and tail in the prevailing light. It also appeared to be somewhat smaller. An Altamira Oriole would probably have appeared much bigger and would have had an orange upper wing bar. A Northern (Bullocks) oriole would have had black on the top of the head and orange edges to the tail. A streak-backed Oriole would not have had a jet black back. The bird was first seen in almost exactly the same place as it was observed on April 11, 1995. The bird was seen a few times by others shortly (several days) after April 11, but there are no reports known to the observer of it having been seen after about April 15. The bird could easily be dismissed as a Baltimore oriole if it was flushed and only seen from behind as it flew away.

2
Brown-headed Cowbird
1
Common Yellowthroat
1
Summer Tanager
4
Northern Cardinal
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes