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Checklist S24628720

 
Location
Plat I Reservoir, Douglas County, Oregon, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sat Aug 15, 2015 6:13 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
1
Duration:
6 hour(s), 11 minute(s)
Distance:
1.5 mile(s)
Observers:
Matthew Hunter
Comments:
Took people on tours of about an hour each. Submitted from BirdLog NA for Android v1.9.6
Species
44 species (+1 other taxa) total
150

Most left by 0800.

60
2

Only seen early morning.

2
5
4

Photos

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality
14
15

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality
1

Photos

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality
15

Photos

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality
2
10
2
1

I reviewed my photos and decided on SSHA vs accipiter sp.

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality
1
1
1
1
1
1
2

Juv early. Adult 1030, then both remainder of time. Photos of adult soaring w/Turkey Vulture.

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality
1
1
8
35

Colony hear.

25
50

Mostky at dawn. Probably roosting in bull rush island.

2
1
2
1
40
1
1
2
8
5

Most flying over in morning, calling.

1
25
30
5
2
1
2
250
bird sp.

While getting ready to take a passenger out in my canoe, I spotted this flock of birds about 3/4 mile north of Plat I Reservoir. When first spotted they were flying east, about 200 ft above ground. They continued about a half mile east, then turned south, and lowered their elevation to perhaps 100 ft above ground. They were too far for me to see any detail whatsoever in their plumage. The size and flight seemed right on for Black-bellied Plover, so I strained my ears to see if I could hear their call (or any call), which I could not. I was hoping and expecting them to at least make a pass over Plat I Reservoir; however, as they proceeded south (to the NE of me), they were low enough to be obscured by trees and I lost them. I later drove over to the area, where there were some fields, hoping to find the birds grounded in a field, but never saw them again (no flocks of plovers, pigeons, or crows). Unfortunately, my photos don't seem to reveal enough information to be 100% sure of the species observed. The pointed wing shape, difficult-to-see tail, and small head are consistent with Black-bellied Plover at that distance. Other candidates for the size and flocking behavior I can think of would be Rock Pigeon and American Crow. Rock Pigeon has a more rapid wingbeat (I think?), more noticeable tail, and a flock that size probably would have included at least a few birds with a lot of white, or even all white birds. The only flocks of Rock Pigeon of that number in our area are in Roseburg. American Crow has straighter longer more rounded wings (vs angled and tapered/pointed), and more floppy flight. Black-bellied Plover was my initial impression and best guess, but this size flock in the central Umpqua Valleys is unprecedented. If you see any clues as to the identity of these birds, or think of another species that should be considered, please contact me. I have photos of a large flock of American Crows in this checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S20674836

Many viewers suggested Black Tern. Others include Killdeer.

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality

© Matthew Hunter

Average Quality
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes