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Checklist S22509813

 
Location
Grand Princess Cruise - 21 March 2015 - 9 AM, Lincoln County, Oregon, US ( Map )
Date and Effort
Sat Mar 21, 2015 9:00 AM
Protocol:
eBird Pelagic Protocol
Party Size:
20
Duration:
1 hour(s)
Distance:
40.15 kilometer(s)
Observers:
Curtis Marantz
Species
11 species (+1 other taxa) total
5

(among birds that I saw well was an adult, light-morph and a dark morph – 0/3/1)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1 4
10

[5/0/0]

1

Given that we saw so many Sabine's Gulls on this trip, I did not write separate descriptions each hour or even note which ones were seen better than others. Over the entire trip, or even each day, however, we were able to see at least some of these bird quite well and I took photos of some of the closer birds. As such, I am including for each hour noted the same composite description for this species and will add when possible any photographs that I was able to get during the appropriate hour in which they were taken. Many of the birds that we saw were adults in alternate plumage with full, dark hoods and I saw none that had an obvious tail-band. These were generally small gulls that had slim, pointed wingtips, and flew with a buoyant, tern-like flight often well above the water, but some birds were seen sitting on the water in small to medium-sized flocks. As far as I could determine, the birds seen well all had the neck, underparts, rump, and tail entirely white. The medium-gray of the back and wing coverts contrasted sharply with a black wedge that extended along the leading edge of the wing and a broad white wedge that appeared to cover the secondaries, innermost primaries, and probably also at least some of the upperwing coverts. I never did see a pale tip to the bill, or the the colors of the eyes, legs, or feet. [0/1/0]

ML132917901

© Curtis Marantz

3

(I missed these birds – 0/0/3)

5

(I recorded at least one of these birds as an adult, but I likely missed the others – 2/5/0)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1 4
3

(we saw an adult and two first-cycle birds on this leg of the trip – 1/2/1)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 2 1
1

(we saw a single Laysan Albatross during this leg of the trip at 44° 49' 51" N, 125° 06' 38" W – 0/0/1)

1

(I saw only a single bird during this leg of the trip that was close enough to identify with confidence – 6/1/1)

40
albatross sp.

(I either missed altogether, or saw only at a distance that was much too far to identify, a large aggregation of albatrosses that were seen by others; most, if not all were presumably Black-footed Albatrosses – 0/0/0)

4

[2/1/3]

2

The best seen individual today was initially spotted at some distance as it approached the ship from the northeast at 9:32 am at 44° 42' 25" N, 125° 06' 10" W, but it then spent an extended period of time matching the speed of the ship as it cruised back-and-forth within 300 meters of the ships’ right side. The light was somewhat better than it was for the first bird seen today, but this bird was not quite as close as was the first individual seen today. Given the light winds, this bird again flew with alternating wing-beats that were relatively rapid and arcing low over the water with the wings bowed downward and angled backward in a profile that was quite different from that of a Northern Fulmar that at one point was flying with this bird.
I noted when the two birds were together that this bird was somewhat smaller and slimmer-winged than the fulmar. Also evident was a stocky body, a rounded head, a short neck, a rather long tail end, and slim wings that tapered to more sharply pointed tips than those of the fulmar. Further apparent when this bird glided was that the wings were bowed downward below the level of the body and they were more obviously bent backward at the wrist. Despite the generally similar coloration of the petrel and fulmar, these two birds were conspicuously different in their shape and also their flight style.
Although this bird was generally sidelit, the light was better then it was for the first bird that we saw and, as such, I was able to note more of the plumage coloration and patterns. This bird was a cold, dark-brown color overall, yet close inspection revealed that the back contrasted as more gray than the rest of the plumage and that the outer primaries formed a dark wedge along the leading edge of the spread wing. I never really detected a complementary region of dark coloration on the upperside of the wing coverts and it was only in my photos that I was able to discern a paler throat on this bird. Probably a result of the glaring light, it was difficult to see the pattern on the undersides of the wings, but over time I was able to see a light gray patch on the undersides of the outer primaries that was both less contrasting and less extensive than the white underwings of a Sooty Shearwater, but probably more like a subtle suggestion of what one would see on a jaeger. I was unable to determine the precise shape of the pale patches on the primaries, but I was pretty sure that the pale coloration did not extend onto the secondaries or their coverts. My photos further show a stubby, black bill, but I cannot recall noting either clearly in the field, and I never could see the colors of the eyes, legs, or feet on this bird.
Others reported seeing a second Murphy’s Petrel at 44° 49' 51" N, 125° 06' 38" W, but I never did see this bird. [0/1/1]
I did get a number of photos of the best seen individual that I will try to upload in the near future...

2

(I missed both of the Sooty Shearwaters that were seen on this leg of the trip – 0/1/1)

 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes