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Checklist S14956730

 
Location
Salinas WTP (no public access; permit only), Monterey County, California, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sun Aug 18, 2013 10:03 AM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
1
Duration:
2 hour(s), 8 minute(s)
Distance:
1.5 mile(s)
Observers:
Brian Sullivan List , Curtis Marantz
Species
61 species (+4 other taxa) total
35
Canada Goose

(calling; I again counted 35 birds in the air at once)

4
Gadwall

(seen scattered across Pond #2 to the southeast of where we spent most of our time)

26
Mallard

(most of not all were on Pond #2 to the southeast of where we spent most of our time)

1
Lesser Scaup

A female seen with the Mallard flock at the south end of Pond #2 was a dark chocolate-brown color overall, but with a well-defined margin of white at the base of the bill. Despite the distance I thought this bird had the somewhat peaked appearance to the head typical of a Lesser Scaup yet the head was just as dark as the body, unlike a female Ring-necked Duck.

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female 1
Sex Unknown
7
Ruddy Duck

(I saw five together and a sixth some distance away, but I apparently missed a seventh)

3
Double-crested Cormorant

(I saw only one of the cormorants seen by others)

1
Great Blue Heron

(calling; I repeatedly saw what I thought was the same immature, but Brian listed three birds)

1
Green Heron

(I missed one seen by Dick)

4
Black-crowned Night-Heron

(I saw two juveniles and one adult)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 2 1 1
6
Turkey Vulture

(I saw only one of the six included by Brian)

2
Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis)

(I saw one adult, but Brian listed two birds)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1 1
2
American Coot (Red-shielded)
20
Black-necked Stilt

(calling; I counted 18 together on Pond #B1, but I am unsure how much overlap there was between these birds and those seen elsewhere on the site; the birds seen included a few fresh juveniles)

2
American Avocet

(I finally saw the continuing birds that I had missed until today)

20
Semipalmated Plover

(calling; I counted 18 in one pass across Pond #B1, yet I saw one or two others in various other ponds and suspect there was only partial overlap)

43
Killdeer

(calling; I encountered maybe 25-30, but I did not count these today)

4
Marbled Godwit

(calling; we again saw what was presumably the same four, juvenile godwits that have been present each day)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 4
1
Curlew Sandpiper

(a description will be sent to the CBRC of the continuing bird apparently in first-alternate plumage that was found by Rick Fournier on 15 August and seen today between 9:45 and 11:58 am; we heard this bird giving a rolling "tdrrrp" call that I thought seemed intermediate between the calls of Least and Baird's Sandpipers)

The photos below were taken by Brian Sullivan. I will try to upload my photos shortly...

Curlew Sandpiper, Salinas, CA, 8-18-2013

Curlew Sandpiper, Salinas, CA, 8-18-2013

Curlew Sandpiper, Salinas, CA, 8-18-2013

Curlew Sandpiper, Salinas, CA, 8-18-2013

Curlew Sandpiper, Salinas, CA, 8-18-2013

© Brian Sullivan

Average Quality
Age:
Adult

© Brian Sullivan

Average Quality
Age:
Adult

© Brian Sullivan

Average Quality

Upper right.

Age:
Adult

© Brian Sullivan

Average Quality
Age:
Adult

© Brian Sullivan

Average Quality
Age:
Adult

© Brian Sullivan

Average Quality
Age:
Adult
2
Baird's Sandpiper

(we again saw what were probably the same two juveniles that have been present for several days)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 2
125
Least Sandpiper

(calling; I again did not count the Least Sandpipers, but I thought the number present was comparable to past days; I saw both adults and juveniles, but I did not attempt to determine the age ratio)

15
Western Sandpiper

(I did not carefully count the peep today, yet I suspect the total was again in the range of 15-20 as opposed to the 60 estimated by Brian)

8
Short-billed Dowitcher

(calling; all eight birds were juveniles, and presumably the same birds that have been present at this site each day we have visited)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 8
75
Long-billed Dowitcher

(calling; the bulk of the dowitchers flew off today before I had a chance to count them, but the vast majority of these birds were adult Long-billed Dowitchers in alternate plumage)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 75
1
Short-billed/Long-billed Dowitcher

(one bird seen briefly by Brian may have been an early, juvenile Long-billed Dowitcher, but it flew off before he could be sure)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1
15
Wilson's Phalarope

(I counted a flock of 13 birds on Pond #2 to the southeast of the smaller ponds and later saw what was presumably the same flock of 13 birds on the smaller ponds, but I am less sure if the singles that I saw here and there were included in this total, so the real total was probably in the range of 15-20 birds; Brian noted a mix of adults and juveniles, but I did not study these birds carefully today)

26
Red-necked Phalarope

(I counted 26 relatively distant Red-necked Phalaropes together on Pond #2 to the southeast of where we spent most of our time)

1
Spotted Sandpiper

(calling; I saw this bird only in flight, so I could not determine its age)

3
Greater Yellowlegs

(calling; I saw together at least three juveniles)

8
Lesser Yellowlegs

(calling; I counted five together yet I saw single elsewhere and have no idea how much overlap there was between these birds, so my estimate would have been six to eight; all seen were juveniles)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 8
1
Franklin's Gull

We saw this bird repeatedly during our visits to the ponds over a three-day period, but I then waited a few days to write a description, so some of the finer details have become fuzzy in my memory. Thankfully, I did manage to get some reasonable photos of this bird that can be used to fill in some of the gaps in my memory. Typically, this bird stood with the larger gulls on the dike to the south of Pond #B1, but we also saw it standing on the flats in the middle of this pond, swimming in Pond #3 and at the southern end of Pond #2, and flying around. I am not sure who first found this bird or on what date, but I do know that it was known to be present before we arrived.
This was a small, elongate gull that was dwarfed by the larger California Gulls, one of which even tried to land on top of it at one point. In addition to its smaller size, this bird was far more delicate in its structure, in that it had a slimmer bill, a longer neck, and much longer wings. I estimated that the bill would have extended backward to the rear edge of the auriculars, and I noted that it was straight and of roughly comparable without throughout its length before tapering to a pointed tip. The forehead was relatively steep and the crown was more strongly rounded than those of the larger gulls, which gave it a somewhat domed appearance. The head did not appear particularly large given the size of the bird and, at least at times, the neck seemed both longer and slimmer than those of the larger birds. The body was plump and full-chested, yet the long wings gave this bird a conspicuously elongate appearance. I thought the primary projection was at least double the length of the exposed tertials, and I noted the tips of at least four primaries in a wingtip that extended well beyond the tip of the tail, which was squared-off and at most half as long as the body without the head and neck. The legs also seemed to be relatively long and slim.
This was a more boldly patterned bird than the California Gulls, but the patterns were not all that different despite its more grayish and sooty coloration. The forehead and lower part of the face were white, but there was both a large spot of blackish just before the eyes and a solid, black auricular-patch that when combined with blackish clouding on the crown and nape gave this bird a partially hooded appearance. Also conspicuous were broad crescents of white both above and below each eye. The back and sides of the neck and breast were clouded with dusky gray, but the throat, foreneck, breast, belly, flanks, and undertail coverts were white and unmarked. The back and scapulars combined feathers that were dark gray with narrow, whitish fringes with those that were sooty-gray and only indistinctly fringed. The wing coverts had dark gray centers that contrasted with broad and somewhat diffuse fringes of sandy-brown to create a scaly pattern on the smaller feathers but a pattern of more elongate boxes on the larger greater-coverts. The tertials, by contrast, were blackish centrally, but with a relatively broad and well-defined fringe of white that extended along the outer edge and across the tip of each feather. The exposed primaries were each black with a small, white spot at the tip. I saw the rump and tai primarily when this bird was in flight, when I noted that the white on the rump and the base of the tail contrasted sharply with a broad black tail-band that was bordered basally, distally, and on the sides by white. Not only was there a narrow tip of white to the tail, but the outer rectrices (and maybe one or two pairs inward) had a white fringe along the outer web that demarcated white black internally.
The bill was black, the eyes were dark, and the legs and whatever I saw of the feet appeared to be dull pinkish.

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1

© Brian Sullivan

Average Quality
Age:
Juvenile
1
Ring-billed Gull

(I did not see this bird today)

30
California Gull

(I thought there were about 30 gulls, but they were more widely spread today so I did not count them; I again noted about six juveniles)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 6 24
2
Mourning Dove

(I did not see any doves today)

1
Anna's Hummingbird

(I did not encounter a bird reported by Brian)

2
Nuttall's Woodpecker

(calling; I heard both "pik" and rattle calls by two unseen birds)

1
Downy Woodpecker

(calling; I heard "whinny" calls by a bird that I saw only as it flew overhead)

6
Black Phoebe

(calling)

1
Hutton's Vireo

(a silent bird seen along the riparian corridor)

1
Warbling Vireo

(a silent bird seen along the riparian corridor)

1
California Scrub-Jay

(calling; heard-only)

2
American Crow

(calling)

3
Horned Lark

(calling; flushed off the dry Pond #A1)

2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
5
Tree Swallow

(calling)

20
Violet-green Swallow
50
Barn Swallow

(calling)

4
Cliff Swallow
150
swallow sp.
15
Chestnut-backed Chickadee

(calling)

1
Marsh Wren

(seen briefly as it flew between two patches of vegetation around one of the ponds)

10
Bewick's Wren

(calling; all were along the riparian corridor of the river)

1
Wrentit

(singing; an unseen bird heard along the riparian corridor)

1
American Robin

(calling; an unseen bird heard along the riparian corridor)

60
European Starling

(I saw only a few starlings today, but I missed a larger flock)

2
Common Yellowthroat

(calling; heard-only)

1
Yellow Warbler

(I missed a bird seen by Dick along the riparian corridor, but I thought I may have heard another, unseen bird singing)

4
Wilson's Warbler

(calling; the bird I saw was a female with an incomplete cap)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female 1
Sex Unknown 3
5
Savannah Sparrow

(calling; none seen particularly well today)

15
Song Sparrow

(calling)

1
Lazuli/Indigo Bunting

(calling; an unseen bunting heard giving "buzz" calls as it flew overhead)

10
Red-winged Blackbird
40
Red-winged Blackbird (California Bicolored)

(calling; of the roughly 50 blackbirds that we saw around the ponds, at least ten males appeared to represent A. p. mailliardorum based on the darker red color and the lack of a pale border to the epaulet; Brian looked at these birds more carefully and thought most if not all represented this subspecies)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 10
Female
Sex Unknown
6
Brewer's Blackbird

(calling)

50
House Finch

(calling; including large numbers perched on the utility wires)

3
American Goldfinch

(calling; unseen birds heard as they flew overhead)

Additional species seen by Brian Sullivan:
12
Song Sparrow (heermanni Group)
1
Lazuli Bunting
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes