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Checklist S14164752

 
Location
Butterbredt Spring, Kern County, California, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Sat May 18, 2013 6:00 AM
Protocol:
Area
Party Size:
8
Duration:
2 hour(s), 20 minute(s)
Area: 5.0 ha
Observers:
Curtis Marantz
Species
43 species (+2 other taxa) total
1

(calling; Tom and possibly others heard one on the slopes above, I suspect before we arrived this morning)

2

(I missed two calling birds seen by Sandy on his walk below the main spring)

1

I briefly saw this bird as it perched atop the "Trees of Heaven" just above the main spring and then flew down the canyon just as we approached. I was first attracted to this bird based on its distinctive cooing song that had a complex pattern that is unlike that of either Morning or Eurasian Collared Dove. Given that I tried to take photos when this bird flew by, my views of it were less than ideal. I was able to notice that this was a relatively large, heavy-bodied dove with a tail that was of medium length, broad, and basically squared-off at the tip. This bird was a warm, medium-brown color almost throughout, but I thought I saw some white along the leading edge of the wing when the bird was perched, and I was quite sure that I saw the bold white patches on the wing coverts when it flew by. My photographs show not only these patches in the wings, but also what appears to be a paler band on the distal part of the tail.

White-winged Dove (IMG_7161) - Butterbredt Spring - 18 May 2013
White-winged Dove (IMG_7159) - Butterbredt Spring - 18 May 2013

10

(I saw a single flock of about six birds as they flew by, but others thought the total was about ten birds)

1

(we briefly saw a single Vaux's Swift as it flew overhead, when I noted that it was a small swift with long wings, a fluttery flight, and plumage that was a relatively dark gray overall, but with a paler gray rump; I was not sure I ever saw the throat or breast as it passed rapidly overhead)

1

(I saw this bird clearly, but I cannot recall having heard it)

1
hummingbird sp.

(a female hummingbird seen at a distance was probably either a Costa's or a Black-chinned, but it was silent and I did not see it all that well)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female 1
Sex Unknown
4

(calling; we heard rattle calls and saw both a male and a female at the main spring, and Sandy saw two more birds well down the canyon)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female 1
Sex Unknown 2
1

(I missed a bird seen by others above the spring)

4
2

(I missed two birds seen by others)

1

(I saw briefly from the overlook a grayish Empidonax that appeared long-billed and long-tailed, but I am not sure if this was the same bird seen by others and identified as a Dusky Flycatcher)

2

(calling; we heard definitive, male position-notes by at least two Pacific Slope-Flycatchers)

2
Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher (Western Flycatcher)

(two additional "Western" Flycatchers were silent)

1

(I saw at least one kingbird perched atop the cottonwoods)

1

(I missed a shrike seen by Sandy well below the main spring)

1

(Kaaren reported seeing a Cassin's Vireo below the main spring)

6

(calling)

1

(I missed one seen by others)

2

(I saw one of two Barn Swallows that passed low overhead and up the canyon)

1

(I took a few photos of a male that seemed to be foraging at seed ponds on the cottonwoods)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female
Sex Unknown
1

(I missed one seen by Andrew around the main grove of cottonwoods)

3

(singing and calling)

8

(calling; we saw about eight thrushes, from which I heard at least one "wink" call)

2

(calling; I missed two or three waxwings seen by others)

6

(calling; we encountered six or eight finches, an unremarkable number at this site)

2

(I heard what sounded like two unseen siskins calling as they flew overhead and possibly as they perched in the trees)

3

(calling; I missed birds heard, and seen in the case of one male, by others)

5

(calling)

1

(the only bird I saw was an adult with the pale gray lores of Z. l. .gambelii)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female
Sex Unknown 1
6

(singing)

1

(I missed this bird)

2

(singing and calling; heard-only)

1

(I missed a male that was seen by Andrew)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female
Sex Unknown
1

(singing; we heard an unseen bird singing from the cottonwoods)

1

(a male flew overhead at least twice)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female
Sex Unknown
1

(calling; I heard at least one unseen bird)

12

(calling; Yellow Warblers were relatively scarce compared to the numbers of Wilson's Warblers)

25

(I saw about half of the 25 Townsend's Warblers seen by our group and all but two or three of these were females)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 2
Female 10
Sex Unknown 13
4

(I saw one apparent female as it arrived at the main grove, but I missed at least three others)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male
Female 1
Sex Unknown 3
50

(calling; Wilson's was by far the most plentiful warbler seen, with 50 birds considered a conservative estimate by most present)

1

After we missed the bird above the spring just before we arrived, we managed to relocate it repeatedly around the main spring, where it foraged actively along the trunks and branches in the lower parts of the cottonwoods all around the spring. Once or twice I also heard a siskin-like "chu-wee" call given by this bird. This was a small but striking bird with a long tail that was often fanned and held upward as the bird moved about the trunks. I noted the slim, short bill and that the crown had a somewhat peaked appearance on a head that was unremarkable in size. The body was slim and elongate and the neck was more conspicuous than on some warblers. I never noted the primary projection, but I did think the wingtips reached to about the tips of undertail coverts that appeared to be rounded. I failed to note the precise length of the tail relative to the body, but my guess is that it was about as long as the head and body combined. I did not think the legs or feet were remarkable in either their length of mass.
The plumage patterns were a striking combination of black (or blackish-brown in the case of the remiges), a bright scarlet-red, white, and dingy grayish. The head, neck, and upperparts were almost entirely black in color, but I did notice a narrow crescent of white under each eye. The entirely white and unmarked secondary coverts formed a broad panel across the upper part of the wing that contrasted sharply with the black of upperparts and the primary coverts, but when seen well, the remiges appeared to have a brownish cast even though I never could see the secondaries well enough to determine if they had paler fringes. The tail was mostly black centrally, but the outer three pairs of rectrices were extensively white. In the field, I thought the outermost two pairs were effectively white in their entirety, but my photographs show that both had some black on the inner web basally. The third pair of rectrices were white across about the distal half, but the base was black and this seemed more extensive on the inner webs as seen in my photos. Others thought the dark parts of the rectrices were tinged brownish like the remiges, but I never could see this. The throat, sides, and flanks were solidly black, but the center of the breast and belly were a somewhat duller and maybe less crimson shade of red than I often associate with wintering birds. The red faded to dingy gray on the center of the belly just before the insertion points of the legs, behind which the vent region and undertail coverts were dingy gray with blackish mottling that I think represented the centers of these feathers.
The bill, legs, and feet appeared to be uniformly black, and my views of the eyes were insufficient to distinguish the color from the black plumage that characterized the rest of the head.

Painted Redstart (IMG_7145) - Butterbredt Spring - 18 May 2013
Painted Redstart (IMG_7148) - Butterbredt Spring - 18 May 2013

125

(by far the most plentiful species encountered was Western Tanager, many of which did not seem to be slowed by the winds as they flew up the canyon without stopping)

30

(calling; we saw good numbers of grosbeaks passing through, particularly early in our visit)

3

(I missed two females and a male seen by others)

Age & Sex
Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
Male 1
Female 2
Sex Unknown
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes