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Checklist S11311460

 
Location
Sauk Prairie (Skagit Co.), Skagit County, Washington, US ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Tue Aug 07, 2012 4:45 PM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
2
Duration:
49 minute(s)
Distance:
1.3 mile(s)
Observers:
Ryan Merrill
Species
22 species total
4
Rufous Hummingbird
1
American Kestrel

male (imm?) on fencepost

2
Willow Flycatcher
4
American Crow
2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
1
Tree Swallow

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25
Violet-green Swallow
1
Bank Swallow
25
Barn Swallow
1
American Robin
280
European Starling
10
Cedar Waxwing
1
Common Yellowthroat
1
White-crowned Sparrow (pugetensis)
6
Savannah Sparrow
1
Song Sparrow
1
Lazuli Bunting

male, chased off the INBU

1
Indigo Bunting

Indigo Bunting
Passerina cyanea
Sauk Prairie, Skagit County, WA
7 August 2012 - 4:50PM

Sam Riley and I were nearing the north end of Sauk Prairie Road when I stopped the car to briefly check out a particularly nice patch of brushy habitat and were pleased to find a few birds in the bushes including a Willow Flycatcher and a few Cedar Waxwings. Sam then exclaimed "What's that, a bunting?" I soon got on the bird and saw a molting male passerina bunting. The head was a pure deep blue - that of a male Indigo Bunting rather than the pale teal head color of a Lazuli Bunting. The blue extended down through the throat and into the upper breast, slightly farther down than the blue on a Lazuli Bunting extends to. Below this in the center of the breast was another irregularly-shaped patch of deep blue. The rest of the breast was a warm brown color which was more vibrant than typical sandy-brown Lazuli Buntings (and lacked any peach color like female LAZB). The wing had two buffy-brown though rather indistinct wing bars. I never saw the back of the bird. The bird was facing us, though angled so that I could see the left side of the bird. I watched it at this angle from a distance of 15-20 meters for 20+ seconds before reaching into the back of the car for the camera. As I was about to focus on the bird, a male Lazuli Bunting chased it from its perch and they both disappeared into the bushes. The Lazuli soon reappeared briefly before disappearing again. We spent another fifteen minutes trying to see the bird again, but despite pishing and playing recordings had no more bunting sightings. The Lazuli was a much lighter color blue in comparison to the Indigo, with orange in the upper breast and white wing bars. It also appeared to be molting with a few pale brown/gray feathers scattered through the blue areas.

I didn¿t see anything to indicate that the bird may have been a hybrid with Lazuli (such as white wing bars or white belly). Amazingly, this bird was in the same bush as the female Indigo Bunting I photographed on 6 October 2011.

1
Brown-headed Cowbird
2
Brewer's Blackbird
1
Evening Grosbeak
12
American Goldfinch
 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes