Checklist S63353349

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Owner Michael J Good

Traveling
  • 1
  • 1.97 mi
Checklist Comments

A small mixed flock of sparrows was found in the wood edge behind seawall. Gadwall was relocated and a couple of Thick- billed Murre flew past. SEAWATCHING with scope. Gadwall was seen first by Craig Kessekheim,and was foraging in the wrack line. Photos reveal Gadwall continues to find forage at high tide with ABDU and MALL and has been seen mingling with BUFF. Seawall pond outfall is nearby and a great deal of detritus is washed into this upper cove near the road. A well know location for Snow Bunting and a variety of ducks, this is the first Gadwall I have found at this location and is apparently, an unpaired male and as noted by Pete Dunne, "paired males and females remain together throughout the winter." I also think of Gadwall as a fresh water, forested and shrub wetland and pond bird so this is a good example of a Gadwall in a tidal estuary. The winds have been blowing easterly today.

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Observations

  1. Number observed: 1

    Details: Seen first by Craig Kessekheim, this bird was foraging in the wrack line. Photos reveal Gadwall continues to find forage at high tide with ABDU and MALL and has been seen mingling with BUFF. Seawall pond outfall is nearby and a great deal of detritus is washed into this upper cove near the road. A well know location for Snow Bunting and a variety of ducks, this is the first Gadwall I have found at this location and is apparently, an unpaired male and as noted by Pete Dunne, "paired males and females remain together throughout the winter." I also think of Gadwall as a fresh water, forested and shrub wetland and pond bird so this is a good example of a Gadwall in a tidal estuary. The winds have been blowing easterly today.

    Media:
  2. Number observed: 39
  3. Number observed: 35
  4. Number observed: 4

    Details: Appeared to be migrating flying sw like several species this am.

  5. Number observed: 10

    Details: Average shots for the record of males and females foraging together.

    Media:
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. Number observed: 5
  8. Number observed: 2

    Details: Sea-watching at Seawall was productive this morning with many flybys including these two TBMU. White strike on the gape and limited amount of white on the throat were definitive in the scope and passing relatively close by the shore, as were several flocks of birds this morning.

  9. Number observed: 2

    Details: some movement off shore of this diminutive gull a bold M on the back of one bird brought attention to an adult flying with it. Larger then a Bonaparte's Gull, Black wing tips evident.

  10. Number observed: 15
  11. Number observed: 1
  12. Number observed: 3
  13. Number observed: 2

    Details: passing the Duck islands. Distinctive adult White body with Black wingtips and very large . Seen well in the scope

  14. Number observed: 7
  15. Number observed: 1

    Details: Foraging very far out at sea watched briefly in the scope. This was a to me amazing to see this large mostly land based raptor flying several miles out to sea.

    Age & Sex:
    Juvenile Immature Adult Age Unknown
    Male
    Female
    Sex Unknown 1
  16. Number observed: 6
  17. Number observed: 1

    Details: A large sparrow with gray supercillium, radish gray face and red articular to the malar. White wing bars not conspicuous but present..

  18. Number observed: 3
  19. Number observed: 1

    Details: Surprising. Crisp streaking along the flanks through the malar and smalll size compared to the SOSP next to it. A mixed flock in the edge habitat.

    I knew, there are no accepted winter records and I did not get pics. This was clearly a Lincoln's and not Swamp by the crisp streaking and not SOSP because of the size and thick black streaking on the chest of SOSP. Good looks at the tail coverts which also has some conspicuous streaking, Good looks at LISP moving and stopping with bins and clearly slightly smaller then the SOSP with them, and then the Fox sparrow was in the mix as well. The Lincoln's and Fox were near the Bathroom and across the road behind Seawall Picnic area . The flock initially flew up over the road just west of the Seawall bathroom. I was about 25 feet away moving about trying to keep up with them. 15 to 20 as they settled into the shrubs. Observation was a good 2-4 minute in and out of the underbrush. Skulking behavior but good looks at LISP in good light. They all kept moving but I could hear them for a little while.

    Lincoln's was easily distinguished from the other two species. They appeared, at the time to be moving through the underbrush of the shrub community. There were steady to gusty easterly winds that entire day and night.

    MDI and the region has had some good lingering birds this winter, BHVI and a few warbler species as well. The wind has been good for migration of any species lingering. The wind patters have been quite hectic and variable since before the New Year. I have 100% confidence of what I saw and recorded.

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