Checklist S50898147

Sharing links
Location
Panchghora, Durgapur expressway

Owner Sandip Das

Traveling
  • 1
  • 2 km

Observations

  1. Number observed: 1
  2. Number observed: 12
  3. Number observed: 2
  4. Number observed: 3
  5. Number observed: 5
  6. Number observed: 3
  7. Number observed: 3
  8. Number observed: 2
  9. Number observed: 6
  10. Number observed: 2
  11. Number observed: 4
  12. Number observed: 1
  13. Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 2
  15. Number observed: 5
  16. Number observed: 5
  17. Number observed: 2
  18. Number observed: 2
  19. Number observed: 30
  20. Asian/Lesser Short-toed Lark Alaudala cheleensis/rufescens

    Number observed: 1

    Details: According to Tim Inskipp,
    "The long primary projection beyond the tertials narrows the possibilities down to Asian Short-toed (= Lesser Short-toed in Rasmussen & Anderton Birds of South Asia) & Sand Lark, because Greater Short-toed, Hume's & Ashy-crowned Sparrow Lark all have the primaries concealed under the tertials. The shape of the bill does seem to be variable in Sand Lark but note that the nominate race (which occurs everywhere except in extreme NW India) has a longer, more curved bill than the western races - the OBI pic linked by Abhishek Das is from West Bengal (as is the bird in question) and shows this feature well. The bird looks very similar to an Asian Short-toed from Tibet in OBI http://orientalbirdimages.org/search.php?p=11&Bird_ID=2019&Bird_Family_ID=&pagesize=1 and I think the bill shape, long primary projection and plumage fit this species better than Sand Lark. Shantanu Bhattacharya can you provide details of the Bosipota record mentioned above (note that OBI is in error listing Asian Short-toed as a synonym of Sand). "


    Here is the fb link attached-

    https://m.facebook.com/groups/5448197410?view=permalink&id=10151173516497411


    According to Per Alström,
    "My immediate impression was Asian/Lesser Short-toed Lark, and that seems to be the most likely one. However, I find it hard to be 100% sure it’s not a Sand Lark of the western subspecies adamsi." on 31.05.2018

    "I’d say definitely not Sand Lark. Difficult to be sure of which of the soon-to-be-split species it is, but I’d say probably A. heinei (which is also more migratory). More to come later this year..." on 02.01.2019 he wrote again on it.

    Best wishes

    Per
    ______________________________________________________________________

    Per Alström

    Media:
  21. Number observed: 4
  22. Number observed: 15
  23. Number observed: 2
  24. Number observed: 2
  25. Number observed: 1
  26. Number observed: 20
  27. Number observed: 20
  28. Number observed: 1
  29. Number observed: 4
  30. Number observed: 6
  31. Number observed: 11
  32. Number observed: 2
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