Checklist S68166006

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Owner Logan Lalonde

Traveling
  • 1
  • 6.136 km
Checklist Comments

Mostly sunny, with small streams of mostly harmless clouds. Wind gusts up to 27kph mostly clustered around 12:50-14:00. Good passerine migration push. Several duck rafts on the lake and the only bird over the lake was a Black-tailed Gull.

Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 2.0.121

Observations

  1. Number observed: 6
  2. Number observed: 4

    Details: Raft w/GADW, AMWI, RNDU, 2 GRSC, LESC, 6 REDH, NOPI

  3. Number observed: 5

    Details: Raft w/NSHO, AMWI, RNDU, 2 GRSC, LESC, 6 REDH, NOPI

  4. Number observed: 20

    Details: Raft w/GADW, NSHO, RNDU, 2 GRSC, LESC, 6 REDH, NOPI

  5. Number observed: 2
  6. Number observed: 10

    Details: Raft w/GADW, AMWI, RNDU, 2 GRSC, LESC, 6 REDH, NSHO

  7. Number observed: 25

    Details: Raft in the middle of the lake

  8. Number observed: 8

    Details: 2 in middle of lake with GWTE

  9. Number observed: 4

    Details: Raft w/GADW, AMWI, NSHO, 2 GRSC, LESC, 6 REDH, NOPI

  10. Number observed: 16

    Details: Including 7 in near middle of lake alone

  11. Number observed: 2

    Details: Raft w/GADW, AMWI, NSHO, RNDU, 2 GRSC, 6 REDH, NOPI

  12. Number observed: 11

    Details: 6 middle of lake with GWTE

  13. Number observed: 2
  14. Number observed: 1
  15. Number observed: 2
  16. Number observed: 1
  17. Number observed: 2
    Breeding Code: P Pair in Suitable Habitat (Probable)
  18. Number observed: 1
  19. Number observed: 2
  20. Number observed: 174

    Details: Flock flying north over lake

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  21. Number observed: 1

    Details: Scoped the distant ridges and lake with my Swarovski for 5 hours today at the Fire Cabin. Panoramic views, allowing great visuals for seemingly almost all migrants present. Excellent duck numbers on the lake but nearly no birds of prey over the ridges. On my final scan I reach the edge of the ridge and pick up a gull high in the air over the middle of the lake ( I am sitting on the pinnacle of the mountain so the bird is at eye level ) and I thought it was odd to get a gull this high in the air, alone, circling. Anyways, I glanced at a dark mantle and thought California. As the bird circled in beautiful light, I noticed the primaries were solid black, with no white windows, and the mantle was several shades darker than California, but not dark enough for Lesser Black-backed. My interest was peaked. The wing shape was more elongated than I would expect for California, and the primaries were very pointed. It then finished its bank and I saw its tail - bicolored - white based with a thick black band at the end. I thought - that’s odd. It did not sink in to me the magnitude of what was happening. So, I didn’t grab my camera and continued to study this mystery gull. Full adult bird, with snow white underbelly and very long, skinny but sturdy bill with thick black ring. Body stature supremely elegant and long, and tail large and wide in proportion to its body. Black primaries had a fairly distinct cutoff to the dark slate grey colour of the rest of the wings. Underwings white, distinctly transitioning into grey near the end of the secondaries and continuing to the end of the wings - unlike all local gulls. After excellent looks of the bird continually spiralling upwards and further away in the blue sky, the fact hit me about what I was looking at. I internally screamed at myself in frustration and grab for my camera, taking my eye off the scope. By that time, the bird had reached a layer of cumulus clouds ( approximately 1200m elevation ) and I was unable to relocate it due to the disorientation when I disconnect my ocular attenuation from inside of the scope. However, after putting the pieces together in my brain, I fully absorbed what I had just seen. Black-tailed Gull. Wow. I have seen over 50,000 gulls in my life, and comprehensibly know all locally regular species and potential dark-backed rarities to the area, (I.e. Lesser-backed, Great Black-backed, Kelp), except for Slaty-backed, but that species had long been ruled out for this bird. I am 100% sure about this identification, and I will swear an oath in court to this fact if it ever comes to that. It is an unmistakable bird in the conditions that I viewed it under. I am so excited, my hands are visibly shaking. Edit - 4 hours later - checked eBird and it seems as though there is a string of May records in the Aleutians as well as a May 4th record (4 days later) in coastal British Columbia only 3 years prior to this bird. A vagrant pattern emerging perhaps.

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  22. Number observed: 4
  23. Number observed: 2
  24. Number observed: 2
  25. Number observed: 3

    Details: Migrants

  26. Number observed: 4
  27. Number observed: 1
  28. Number observed: 1
  29. Number observed: 6
  30. Number observed: 1

    Details: Right overhead at the Fire Cabin

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  31. Number observed: 1
  32. Number observed: 1
  33. Number observed: 2
  34. Number observed: 1

    Details: Circling high in the air, migrating

  35. Number observed: 1
  36. Number observed: 21

    Details: Counted 1 by 1 mostly by vocals while walking. Abundant in moister and denser forest than Dusky.

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  37. Number observed: 10
  38. Number observed: 1
  39. Number observed: 1
  40. Number observed: 12
  41. Number observed: 6
    Breeding Code: P Pair in Suitable Habitat (Probable)
  42. Number observed: 1

    Details: Was on steep slate-ridden slope at the Fire Cabin, then took off northwest towards the Westside.

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  43. Number observed: 5
  44. Number observed: 5
  45. Number observed: 9
  46. Number observed: 1
  47. Number observed: 4

    Details: Together for a cameo appearance at the Fire Cabin

  48. Number observed: 1
  49. Number observed: 26
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  50. Number observed: 3
  51. Number observed: 1
  52. Number observed: 9
  53. Number observed: 3
  54. Number observed: 3
  55. Number observed: 4
  56. Number observed: 8
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  57. Number observed: 1
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  58. Number observed: 3
  59. Number observed: 10

    Details: 8 in group flying north over centre of lake

    Breeding Code: F Flyover (Observed)
  60. Number observed: 1
  61. Number observed: 10
  62. Number observed: 3
  63. Number observed: 14
  64. Number observed: 6
  65. Number observed: 19
  66. Number observed: 343

    Details: Including flock of 28 flying north over lake

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  67. Number observed: 1

    Details: In gulley with WCSPs

  68. Number observed: 9
  69. Number observed: 1
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  70. Number observed: 1

    Details: Uncommon and local in checklist area. This one in boggy habitat in the Wildlife Corridor.

  71. Number observed: 4
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  72. Number observed: 24
  73. Number observed: 1
  74. Number observed: 6
  75. Number observed: 23

    Details: Nice close looks of many birds

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  76. Number observed: 1

    Details: Yellow tail coverts seen in flight

    Breeding Code: F Flyover (Observed)
  77. Number observed: 112
  78. Number observed: 2

    Details: At the Fire Cabin

  79. Number observed: 3
  80. Number observed: 1

    Details: At the Fire Cabin

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