Checklist S51975748

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Owner Diana Doyle

Traveling
  • 1
  • 5 mi
Comments

Two hikers, walking around lake checking all duck rafts. 43-51f, clear, calm. No other wildlife.

Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.8.15

Observations

  1. Number observed: 20
  2. Number observed: 37
  3. Number observed: 1
  4. Number observed: 5
  5. Gadwall x Northern Pintail (hybrid)

    Number observed: 1

    Comments: I believe I originally saw this individual on 1/21/19. At that time, the bird was distant and in wave chop and all the field marks suggested Black Scoter (large size, clean dark cap, gray cheek, slim black bill) and the body appeared completely black. But today I returned to try to get a photo. Conditions were flat calm, visibility excellent. I waited to to let the bird get closer to shore and progressively positioned myself to get better light. Today when I first saw the distant large waterfowl with a cap and gray cheek, something didn't sit right for Black Scoter. When I had originally seen it, the conditions made the body look pure black, and visibility was worse in the waves. Today the body looked all wrong. Sure enough, my progressive photos show that this is clearly a duck sp., not a scoter sp. But what species?? The tip-off was my final closest photo in the best light, which clearly shows Gadwall body plumage! I couldn't find anything similar in my field guides. But after some internet research, my photos appear to match a Gadwall x Northern Pintail hybrid. The Gadwall parentage created that plumaged body with the Northern Pintail elements producing the dark cap against a gray cheek and the slim black bill. Note that at one point the duck stretched its neck and I did see a tick of a neck mark.
    Here are some sample images from the web of GADWxNOPI:
    http://magazine.outdoornebraska.gov/2014/05/gadwall-hybrid/
    https://search.macaulaylibrary.org/catalog?taxonCode=x00610
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/uropsalis/22600368298

    Media:
  6. Number observed: 4

    Comments: one male

  7. Number observed: 1

    Comments: male

  8. Number observed: 20
  9. Number observed: 4

    Comments: 3 female-types and 1 male, all seen individually. Flagged as high count so I'm attaching a couple of incidental photos that show this species.

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  10. Number observed: 25
  11. Number observed: 70
  12. Number observed: 16

    Comments: Counted as walked around lake

  13. Number observed: 70
  14. Number observed: 2
  15. Number observed: 3
  16. Number observed: 1

    Comments: Two cormorant species flew in, landed for a couple of minutes, then took off again circling lake once. One was almost half the bulk of the other. Photo attached showing comparison.

    Media:
  17. Number observed: 1

    Comments: One of the two different-sized cormorants. This one showed the yellowish lores and was very bulky with a thick neck. Photo attached.

    Media:
  18. Number observed: 1
  19. Number observed: 1
  20. Number observed: 1
  21. Number observed: 8
  22. Number observed: 2
  23. Number observed: 8
  24. Number observed: 2
  25. Number observed: 3
  26. Number observed: 1
  27. Number observed: 1
  28. Number observed: 12
  29. Number observed: 2
  30. Number observed: 2
  31. Number observed: 13
  32. Number observed: 2
  33. Number observed: 1
  34. Number observed: 2
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