Checklist S45425758

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Nocturnal
Location
NFC Station Cape Forchu

Owner John Kearney NFC Station Cape Forchu

Nocturnal Flight Call Count
  • 1
Checklist Comments

Time Period - Midnight to astronomical dawn
METADATA
This is an automated recording station.
1. Microphone - SMX-NFC with a 16 bit sampling format and 24,000 Hz sampling rate
2. Recording Equipment - Song Meter 2+ by Wildlife Acoustics
3. Sound Analysis Software - Raven Pro 1.5 alpha
4. Flight Call Extraction – Raven Pro Band Limited Energy Detectors with the following settings: high frequency detector is 5800-11000 Hz, 23-395 ms duration, 104 ms minimum separation, 25% minimum occupancy, 3.5 dB signal/noise ratio threshold, noise power estimation is 4992 ms block size, 244 ms hop size, 50th percentile; low frequency detector is 2250-3750 Hz, 35-325 ms duration, 58 ms minimum separation, 20% minimum occupancy, 3.5 dB signal/noise ration threshold, noise power estimation is 998 ms block size, 244 ms hop size, 50th percentile.
5. Flight Call Identification and Review – Aurally and visually using Raven Pro Review Panel with the following spectrogram parameters: Context window is Hann 128 samples, 247 Hz 3 dB filter bandwidth, 79.7% overlap, 26 samples hop size, 256 samples DFT size, 86.1 Hz grid spacing; Thumbnails are Hann 256 samples, 124 Hz 3 dB filter bandwidth, 87.5% overlap, 32 samples hop size, 256 samples DFT size, 86.1 Hz grid spacing.
6. Notes:

Observations

  1. Number observed: 1

    Details: NFC 4. The calls are distant with 4 notes audible in the recording. The spectrogram of the last note is an excellent match to the spectrogram of the flight call of the American Oystercatcher as illustrated in the account by Erica Nol and Robert Humphrey in the Birds of North America Online. It is also similar in spectrographic analysis to the various notes of American Oystercatcher as illustrated in the work of Pieplow in the Peterson Guide to Bird Sounds and recordings in NatureInstruct. In particular the last note has a duration of a quarter of a second with a frequency between 2.4 to 4.2 kHz. These measurements and the double banded crest shape is totally consistent with the spectrogram of the flight call of Nol and Humphrey. The "whew" call on www.petersonbirdsounds.com most resembles this flight call.

    Media:
  2. Number observed: 1

    Details: NFC 1

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