Checklist S22677121

Sharing links

Owner Ragupathy Kannan

Other participating eBirders
Historical
  • 3
Checklist Comments

With V. Santharam and T. R. Shankar Raman. The spot we birded from was a vast meadow back then, but now a concrete jungle.

Observations

  1. Number observed: 3
  2. Number observed: 6
  3. Number observed: 3
  4. Number observed: X

    Details: Calls heard from T.S. side

  5. Number observed: X
  6. Number observed: 500

    Details: Main congregation on the Theosophical society side

  7. Number observed: 14

    Details: count verified

  8. Number observed: X
  9. Number observed: X
  10. Number observed: 2
  11. Number observed: 40
  12. Number observed: X
  13. Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 1

    Details: Quoting R. Kannan's notes: "Seen first by VS. The bird was single, feeding along with other waders actively. Size: Curlew Sandpiper +; Marsh Sandpiper - . Superficially rather like Reeve, but bill much longer and apparently straight, but when observed with concentration one could make out that it is slightly decurved at tip. Chief striking feature was thick bill. Faint white eye stripe, upperparts greyish brown boldly streaked and blotted with dark brown. Throat and underparts whitish, but with distinct black spots on lower breast arranged in such a way as to make a diffuse broad necklace. Legs short for a bird that big. The bird maintained a horizontal stance and pecked away endlessly. Occasionally flew a few yards to change positions, but once got flushed almost around the estuary with other waders, only to return to the same spot once again and resume feeding. In flight the bird seemed paler (greyer). There was a whitish, diffuse, uncontrasting wing band. Rump whitish, just showing up against the darker tail feathers. The legs were dirty green (seen with difficulty because the bird being so short-legged, was "waist deep" in water and slush most of the time; and when the legs did show through, they were clogged with muck! We could not have hoped for better views. Most of the time, we had the bird "right at our elbow" hardly 40 feet away. excellently immuminated by the setting sun. The Red Knot (Calidris canutus) can be ruled out owing to its short bill"

  15. Number observed: X
  16. Number observed: X
  17. Number observed: X
  18. Number observed: X
  19. Number observed: X
  20. Number observed: X
  21. Number observed: 1

    Details: dark phase. observed successfully fishing.

  22. Number observed: 4
  23. Number observed: 1
  24. Number observed: 1
  25. Number observed: 2
  26. Number observed: X
  27. Number observed: 1
  28. Number observed: 1
  29. Number observed: 2
  30. Number observed: X

    Details: Calls heard

  31. Number observed: X
  32. Number observed: X
  33. Number observed: X
  34. Number observed: 2
  35. Number observed: X

    Details: Heard twice

  36. Number observed: X