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Checklist S52955103

 
Location
Lake Dulverton Conservation Area (Oatlands), Southern Midlands, Tasmania, AU ( Map ) ( Hotspot )
Date and Effort
Wed Feb 20, 2019 1:35 PM
Protocol:
Traveling
Party Size:
2
Duration:
3 hour(s)
Distance:
9.0 kilometer(s)
Observers:
George Vaughan
Comments:
Easily my best ever trip to Dulverton! The waders, especially the Sharp Tails, were in unimaginable numbers! Despite the alternating blistering sun without shade and freezing squalls without shelter, I spent many enjoyable hours combing through the Sharp Tails in search of their ever elusive American relative, the Pec... the list below shall say how that went!
Species
26 species total
80

Including a beautiful family of six by the island, which gave me a pleasant moment's observation.

ML141719551

© George Vaughan

Average Quality
ML141719561

© George Vaughan

Average Quality
ML141719571

© George Vaughan

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6
ML141719621

© George Vaughan

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70
120
ML141719761

© George Vaughan

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1

One Grebe bravely paddling into the waves as the wind picked up! I was very amused at the sight!

ML141723431

© George Vaughan

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ML141723541

© George Vaughan

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ML141723551

© George Vaughan

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60

The air at times veritably seethed with these birds at times!

ML141719821

© George Vaughan

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2

When I noticed a distinctly cinnamon coloured Plover amongst the Red Caps, my curiosity fast turned to astonishment as a Double Banded Plover was revealed! This sturdy bird seemed much surer of itself than the Red Caps, kindly allowing for a close approach without even flushing! I originally thought there to be only one... imagine my surprise when, upon rediscovering it an hour or so later, it strolled in front of another of its kind! At this time of year, and inland, this is about the last bird I was expecting!

ML141720031

© George Vaughan

Average Quality
ML141720041

© George Vaughan

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ML141720091

© George Vaughan

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ML141720121

© George Vaughan

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ML141721361

© George Vaughan

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ML141721371

© George Vaughan

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30

Great numbers... including tiny babies! Their sharp calls were a regular feature of my expedition. Very nice!

Breeding Code
FY Feeding Young (Confirmed)
ML141720181

© George Vaughan

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ML141720201

© George Vaughan

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ML141721211

© George Vaughan

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65

It occurred to me as I wandered the flats, watching an ever increasing stream of Sharp Tails flying in, that any number I could put to their ranks will seem like an exaggeration... this is in fact, amazingly, a very conservative estimate. I strongly suspect the numbers were into the three digit range! With the water levels so low, they've taken to wading far out in the middle of the lake, as well as at the edges... and yet their numbers were healthier than ever! It was a beautiful time, photographing each and every bird and watching them carry out ever activity, from feeding to swimming across deep channels, and even hurtling through the air in fluttering skeins, towering and dipping. A real favourite!

ML141721051

© George Vaughan

Average Quality
ML141721091

© George Vaughan

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ML141721251

© George Vaughan

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ML141721271

© George Vaughan

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ML141721291

© George Vaughan

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ML141721311

© George Vaughan

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ML141721331

© George Vaughan

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1

The best feeling in birding! After a good two hours of wandering the flats, increasingly feeling as if I'd never find the bird I'd come all this way to see, I got the gut-punch feeling of "goodness, that's it!" when I spotted the Pec standing well and truly by itself... except for a Double Banded Plover of which it seemed very fond! Interesting to note this association with the Plover, as my old friend from Orielton in 2018 was almost always a lot happier with Plovers (usually Golden) than the Sharp Tails. I spent a minute or so absorbing the little details; the pleasantly stout build in contrast to the Sharpies, the long, thick, shockingly orange beak and much milder manners, before it randomly flushed into the middle of the lake and was never seen again. This smartest of waders has long been a favourite of mine; I can't overstate my delight at tracking down this much loved bird!

ML141721451

© George Vaughan

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ML141721501

© George Vaughan

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ML141721511

© George Vaughan

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1

A wonderful surprise, as Snipe always are! I just about stood on it before it fluttered off a short way, its pot bellied shape causing me to exclaim its name! It soon landed among a clump of Sharpies, before vanishing into the reeds without any fanfare at all. I suspect its lack of concern was due to the openness of the flats, which must've increased its confidence in keeping watch. While it mightn't still hold the title of my favourite bird, which it did for years, I find the Snipe is still a joy to observe!

ML141721561

© George Vaughan

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ML141721581

© George Vaughan

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6
5
3

Including this handsomely preening bird!

ML141721751

© George Vaughan

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ML141721771

© George Vaughan

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ML141721781

© George Vaughan

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1

I accidentally flushed a Swampie from the flats as I walked out onto them, and this bird caused an immense kerfuffle amongst the Lapwings!

ML141721821

© George Vaughan

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1

I was surprised when a huge Sea Eagle suddenly appeared in the skies over the causeway! I spent a few minutes watching it wheeling and careening on the winds... a beautiful bird!

ML141721941

© George Vaughan

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ML141721951

© George Vaughan

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ML141721971

© George Vaughan

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1

Flew over towards the end of our trip, again causing an immense fuss among the local Lapwings! A very pale bird overall... beautiful!

ML141722131

© George Vaughan

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1

Heard in the distance.

3

I first heard the calls of this frantically flying trio, whom I photographed as they shot over the car park.

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© George Vaughan

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1

Heard.

2
3
45

Great numbers coming very close indeed around the causeway! I was particularly happy at the size of the rookery they've formed on the island! Many beautiful moults to be seen, as well as young being fed by adults! I was also very interested in watching the slow, almost hovering flights the birds made as they plucked insects off the water.

Breeding Code
FY Feeding Young (Confirmed)
ML141722331

© George Vaughan

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ML141722411

© George Vaughan

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ML141722431

© George Vaughan

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2
7

A truly beautiful charm of Goldfinches flew very close by me, landing to feed on their favourite Thistles. A beautiful sight!

75

Mostly in a very large flock out on the flats, almost around the corner from the car park.

 

Are you submitting a complete checklist of the birds you were able to identify?

Yes