Welcome to New Hampshire eBird

Birding in the 21st Century.

News and Features

BirdCast Migration Forecast, 24 April-May 1

Blackburnian Warblers arrive in numbers in the Gulf this week!

Spring is in full swing in North America, and we’ll be featuring the BirdCast migration forecasts weekly to keep you up to date with what birds are arriving in your area. If you want to know what species of migrant birds will be showing up in your neck of the woods on any given week throughout the migration season, this is the place to look! These updates will also be posted on the eBird Facebook and Twitter pages – by following those pages you can get the same information delivered to your social media platform of choice. The BirdCast forecast highlights migrant species that you can expect to see in each of the regions covered: Upper Midwest and Northeast; Gulf Coast and Southeast; Great Plains; and West.

Below are links to each of the regions, where you can see what to expect in your backyard or favorite birding spot! All of these forecasts are generated with your eBird data, and wouldn’t be possible without eBirders like you! Thank you!

BirdCast Regional Migration Forecast, 17-24 April

Painted Buntings arrive in numbers in the Southeast US this week!

Spring has arrived in North America, and we’ll be featuring the BirdCast migration forecasts weekly to keep you up to date with what birds are arriving in your area. If you want to know what species of migrant birds will be showing up in your neck of the woods on any given week throughout the migration season, this is the place to look! These updates will also be posted on the eBird Facebook and Twitter pages – by following those pages you can get the same information delivered to your social media platform of choice. The BirdCast forecast highlights migrant species that you can expect to see in each of the regions covered: Upper Midwest and Northeast; Gulf Coast and Southeast; Great Plains; and West.

Below are links to each of the regions, where you can see what to expect in your backyard or favorite birding spot! All of these forecasts are generated with your eBird data, and wouldn’t be possible without eBirders like you! Thank you!

BirdCast Regional Migration Forecast, 3-10 April

Species like this Prairie Warbler are arriving back in the Gulf Coast and Southeast region this week!

Spring has arrived in North America, and we’ll be featuring the BirdCast migration forecasts weekly to keep you up to date with what birds are arriving in your area. If you want to know what species of migrant birds will be showing up in your neck of the woods on any given week throughout the migration season, this is the place to look! These updates will also be posted on the eBird Facebook and Twitter pages – by following those pages you can get the same information delivered to your social media platform of choice. The BirdCast forecast highlights migrant species that you can expect to see in each of the regions covered: Upper Midwest and Northeast; Gulf Coast and Southeast; Great Plains; and West.

Below are links to each of the regions, where you can see what to expect in your backyard or favorite birding spot! All of these forecasts are generated with your eBird data, and wouldn’t be possible without eBirders like you! Thank you!

Birdcast Regional Migration Forecast, 27 March–3 April

osprey

Spring has arrived in North America, and we’ll be featuring the BirdCast migration forecasts weekly to keep you up to date with what birds are arriving in your area. If you want to know what species of migrant birds will be showing up in your neck of the woods on any given week throughout the migration season, this is the place to look! These updates will also be posted on the eBird Facebook and Twitter pages – by following those pages you can get the same information delivered to your social media platform of choice. The BirdCast forecast highlights migrant species that you can expect to see in each of the regions covered: Upper Midwest and Northeast; Gulf Coast and Southeast; Great Plains; and West.

Below are links to each of the regions, where you can see what to expect in your backyard or favorite birding spot! All of these forecasts are generated entirely with your eBird data, and wouldn’t be possible without eBirders like you! Thank you!

BirdCast Regional Migration Forecasts – Spring is Here!

regional-migration

Spring has arrived in North America, as hard as that can be to believe in the northern regions of the continent. However, the BirdCast Regional Migration Forecasts have begun – and that means the birds can’t be far behind! Do you want to know what species of migrant birds will be showing up in your neck of the woods on any given week throughout the migration season? If so, tune in to BirdCast on Fridays for a weekly update on the Species on the Move in your region! These updates will also be posted on the eBird Facebook and Twitter pages – by following those pages you can get the same information! The BirdCast forecast highlights migrant species that you can expect to see in each of the regions covered: West; Great Plains; Upper Midwest and Northeast; and Gulf Coast and Southeast.

Here are links to each of the regions, where you can see what to expect in your backyard or favorite birding spot! All of these forecasts are generated with your eBird data, and wouldn’t be possible without eBirders like you!

New Hampshire Bird Records – Spring is Here!

Black-necked Stilt by Len Medlock (inflight) and Jason Lambert, 5/20/14, Stratham, NH. Cerulean Warbler by Scott Heron, 5/5/14, Kingston, NH.

It still feels like winter outside, but it’s spring in the bird world and the Spring 2014 issue of New Hampshire Bird Records is now available to remind us all of what’s to come.

We have returning warblers to look forward to and you can read about our two waterthrushes, Louisiana and Northern (despite their names, they aren’t thrushes) in a free article by Steve Mirick on the web.

Click here to read more about our current issue.

2015 Superbowl of Birding Adventures with the “Twitchers in the Rye”

twitchers-2015-portal

On January 25, one day after a snow storm, the “Twitchers in the Rye” took part in the 2015 Superbowl of Birding. The team included Becky Suomala, Pat Myers, Andrea Robbins, and myself, and in a significant departure from the other teams operating in New Hampshire, we restrict ourselves entirely to the town of Rye.

Our highlights this year were a Gray Catbird, Red-shouldered Hawk, and Winter Wren (all three are four-point birds). It was also nice to find the continuing female Harlequin Duck at Concord Point (although it took us two tries). The final total was 59 species and 109 points, and the team raised more than $2,000 in pledges for New Hampshire Bird Records and NH eBird (two projects of NH Audubon’s Conservation Department). Many thanks to our sponsors!

Twitchers in the Rye and the Superbowl of Birding – January 24th

The 2014 Twitchers in the Rye (Pat Myers, captain Pam Hunt, driver Becky Suomala, and rookie Peg Ackerson), January 25, 2014. Photo by Rick Dumont.

The “Twitchers in the Rye” will be in the Superbowl of Birding again this year and are accepting pledges to support NH eBird and New Hampshire Bird Records (both programs of NH Audubon’s Conservation Department).

For those who don’t know, the Superbowl involves looking for as many species as possible in 12 hours and is run by Mass Audubon’s Joppa Flats Education Center. Teams compete in Essex County, MA and/or Rockingham County, NH on the last Saturday in January (the 24th). “Twitchers” decided to restrict their search area to just one town (hence the name!), even though there’s no category for that in the competition.

Help spur “Twitchers” on by pledging an amount per species or per point (different species get different numbers of points) – and support the collection of bird data for conservation at the same time. This is our seventh year and we’re still trying to beat our first year highs of 63 species and 112 points! When it’s below freezing and blowing a gale, pledges help keep us going – knowing each species or point will help build contributions for conservation!

If you’d like to pledge, please contact Becky Suomala at rsuomala@nhaudubon.org or 603-224-9909 x309 or pledge on-line here. For last year’s results check the New Hampshire Bird Records website.

New Hampshire Bird Records – New Issue – Winter 2013/2014 Published

Snowy Owl by Terri Fratus, 2/28/14, Rye, NH. Townsend’s Warbler by Deanne Fortnam, 12/12/13, Odiorne Pt. SP, Rye, NH. Spotted Towhee by David Lipsy, 2/1/14, Rye, NH.

Do you remember all the Snowy Owl sightings last winter? It was a historic irruption and one of the largest ever in the Northeast, according to Pam Hunt, the Winter Editor for New Hampshire Bird Records. She’s written about the invasion in the Winter 2013-14 issue and there are photo highlights from this Snowy Owl “Extravaganza” as well as an article on what the owls were eating.

You can also read about a winter boat trip to Jeffrey’s Ledge with Dovekies and other alcids in a free article on the web. Also in the Winter 2013-14 issue: bird highlights from the season including Spotted Towhee and Townsend’s Warbler, the Christmas Bird Count Summary and its history, where to bird in Nashua, NH in the winter, Field Notes including the rescue of a downed grebe, Adventures with the Twitchers in the Rye, and the regular Photo Quiz.

For subscription information click here or go directly to the online subscription page.

New Hampshire Bird Records – New Issue – Fall 2013 Published

Cover Photos: Calliope Hummingbird by Christine Sheridan, 10/28/13, S. Mammoth Rd., Manchester, NH. Rufous Hummingbird (smaller photo) by Kyle Wilmarth, 9/22/13, Durham, NH.

Read about Common Nighthawk migration in the Fall 2013 issue of New Hampshire Bird Records. This free article is now available on the web.

The fall issue is full of migration highlights, from the Raptor Migration Report to the highlights of the Fall 2013 bird reports – remember the first arrival of Snowy Owls even before winter officially started?

The issue also features an article on birding World End Pond and other Salem Hotspots by Kyle Wilmarth, a Spotlight on White-eyed Vireo by Steve Mirick, the results from the Concord November Challenges (which set a new record) by Pam Hunt, observations of insect-eating birds switching to berries, and the regular Field Notes, Photo Quiz, and Photo Gallery.

Thanks for your patience as we get caught up on publication.

For NH Bird Records subscription information click here or go directly to the on-line subscription page.