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Birding in the 21st Century.

News and Features

October eBirder of the Month Challenge

This month’s eBirder of the Month challenge, sponsored by Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, will keep get you snapping photos and recording bird sounds. Every time you take a photo or hold out a microphone, you’re creating an incredibly powerful piece of data. Media help document records, provide resources for learning and education, and also pave the way for future eBird and birding tools like Merlin Photo ID. The eBirder of the month will be drawn from eBirders who submit 15 or more eligible checklists in September containing at least one rated photo or sound. Checklists must be for observations during this month; not historical checklists entered during September. Winners will be notified by the 10th of the following month.

eBird Science: Distribution predictions using eBird data are comparable to those from satellite transmitters

Ever since satellite technology has been small enough to put on a bird, researchers have been using transmitters to ask questions about birds that were previously unanswerable. Although some questions still can’t be answered with anything aside from satellites (e.g., precise paths of migrating birds throughout their entire annual cycle), a paper published recently in Global Ecology and Conservation shows that eBird data can be comparable to satellite data when creating species distribution models. The authors of the open-access paper “Species distribution models for a migratory bird based on citizen science and satellite tracking data” have written a great account of their research on Band-tailed Pigeons (below). Thanks to Chris Coxen, Jennifer Frey, Scott Carleton, and Dan Collins for taking the time to share their work with the eBird community.

Final Summer Atlas Season Begins June 1

Swallow-tailed Kite

It’s hard to believe the final Louisiana Summer Bird Atlas
is here. It is time to get out and close out those quads. The priorities are to complete quads where large unsampled areas occur e.g. north of I-10 near Welsh, southern Atchafalaya basin, and on the LA-TX border. If this is your first time to participate, welcome! More information can be found at the Louisiana Bird Resource Office website: http://birdoffice.lsu.edu.