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Birding in the 21st Century.

News and Features

eBird Mobile 1.5 update: My eBird stats

eBird Mobile has been available as a speedy and free data-entry app for iOS and Android devices since 2015. Nearly 200,000 people have used eBird Mobile, and over 50% of all eBird sightings are now entered via the app. Until recently, eBird Mobile has been entirely focused on data collection—today we’re very excited to announce the release of My eBird tools across eBird Mobile! See your life list, your year list, your month list, and how your birding this year compares to your past years. Can you beat your record from last year? Are you ahead of pace this year or a bit behind?

In the coming months, we’ll be adding an eBird Mobile feature that lets you collect GPS tracks of where you bird (making distance calculations easier than ever), as well as more exciting mobile tools.

Download eBird Mobile today

Ecological research uses eBird data to show that migratory birds are falling out of sync with the timing of spring

At eBird, our goal is to connect valuable birdwatcher sightings with research and conservation. The eBird checklists that you’ve entered have been used in over 100 peer-reviewed papers, and hundreds of local, regional, and national conservation decisions. We’re excited to feature one of the most recent papers published on eBird, “Increasing phenological asynchrony between spring green-up and arrival of migratory birds”. Read on to see lead author Stephen Mayor’s story of how eBird data helped illuminate an increasing mismatch between when plants green up and when migrant birds return in spring.

BirdCast Migration Forecast, 19-26 May

It’s BirdCast time! Do you ever wonder what migrant birds will be arriving soon in your local birding spots? BirdCast’s weekly migration forecasts keep you up to date with what’s on deck for migration, highlighting migrant species that you can expect to see. All of these forecasts are generated with your eBird data, and wouldn’t be possible without eBirders like you! Although these forecasts are currently just for the continental United States, as we get more sightings from the rest of the world we’ll be able to bring BirdCast to more regions. Read more to see what’s happening across the US in the coming days.

Global Big Day 2017: birding’s biggest day ever

Birds are inspiring creatures. Their amazing migrations and behaviors capture our imagination, and their global presence lets us appreciate them wherever we are in the world.  The power that birds have to bring people together across cultures, languages, and countries is truly exceptional. Global Big Day is the realization of the magic of birds—a single day where the birding world unites in a shared pursuit, seeking to answer the simple question: how many birds can be seen in one day?

On 13 May 2017, almost 20,000 birders from 150 countries around the world joined together as a global team, contributing more than 50,000 checklists containing 6,564 species—more than 60% of the world’s birds. This is a new record for the number of bird species reported in a single day, and it’s thanks to you. From Antarctica to Zimbabwe, your contributions make this possible.

Enter your Global Big Day sightings before 16 May!

Global Big Day. 13 May 2017. Sightings have already been reported from more than 140 countries around the world, with over 6000 species reported by 15,000 eBirders. Follow live results here.  We’re on track to set a new record for birding’s biggest day for the third year in a row—and your sightings are what make that possible! Enter your sightings in eBird before the end of the day on 16 May (Tuesday) to make them count. There are already more than 1,300 species eBirded from Colombia (!), and Brazil and Peru have crossed the 1,000-species mark as well. Who will finish in the #1 slot? See the cumulative world species list here.

Global Big Day is happening!

This is it! The time has come! Birding’s biggest day is here. Global Big Day has already begun in places like Australia and New Zealand, and the first sightings are on the board. Follow along with real-time updates here. Over the next few days, sightings from 13 May will pour in from all over the world. If you can make it outside for just a few minutes to find at least one bird on 13 May, you’ll be able to join a global team that spans more than 150 countries. Learn how to make your sightings count. We’ll see you out there!

Kalle Rainio, April eBirder of the Month

Please join us in congratulating Kalle Rainio of Littoinen, Finland, winner of the April 2017 eBird Challenge, sponsored by Carl Zeiss Sports Optics. Our April winner was drawn from eBirders who submitted 15 eligible checklists using eBird Mobile in April. Kalle’s name was drawn randomly from the 5,382 eligible eBirders that achieved the April challenge threshold. Kalle will receive new ZEISS Conquest HD 8×42 binoculars for his eBirding efforts. Don’t forget, eBirding on 13 May for Global Big Day could win you binoculars for your participation! Read more to see Kalle’s fantastic story.

Global Big Day—one week away

The familiar Barn Swallow (right) has been recorded in eBird from 222 countries. You can hope to spot a Barn Swallow almost anywhere on the planet, from Alaska to Argentina, Siberia to Australia, Iceland to South Africa. Barn Swallows criss-cross the equator and traverse the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. Their movements not only span an entire planet of birds, but connect a worldwide community of birders.

In the same way, Global Big Day and eBird connect all of your local birds with the rest of the world, making a real difference in the collective understanding of birds worldwide. On 13 May, every bird that you report contributes to the global team total for an unprecedented snapshot of our planet’s bird diversity. Every bird counts.

BirdCast Migration Forecast, 5-12 May

It’s BirdCast time! Do you ever wonder what migrant birds will be arriving soon in your local birding spots? BirdCast’s weekly migration forecasts keep you up to date with what’s on deck for migration. The BirdCast forecasts highlight migrant species that you can expect to see in each of the regions covered: Upper Midwest and Northeast; Gulf Coast and Southeast; Great Plains; and West. All of these forecasts are generated with your eBird data, and wouldn’t be possible without eBirders like you! Although these forecasts are currently just for the continental United States, as we get more sightings from the rest of the world we’ll be able to bring BirdCast to more regions. Read more to see what’s happening across the US in the coming days.

April Millions

Last month brought two major milestones for eBird, amazingly each of the same bird species! On 8 April, Bill Thompson submitted a checklist from Massachusetts that included a Red-tailed Hawk: the 400-millionth sighting in eBird. A couple weeks later, Suzanne Pudelek added a photo of a Red-tailed Hawk from Michigan—the 3-millionth bird photograph in the Macaulay Library. These exciting benchmarks are a testament to the amazing contributions from you, the global community of eBirders. We’re profoundly grateful for everything that you do as a part of eBird. Thank you.

Half-billion, here we come.