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Birding in the 21st Century.

News and Features

Celebration of Canadian birds and bird-science coming in August!

The world’s biggest celebration of birds and bird science is coming to Vancouver, British Columbia, and you’re invited! Bird Studies Canada is proud to be a co-host of the International Ornithological Congress, taking place August 19-26, 2018. The International Ornithological Congress has been held every four years since 1884. More than 2000 bird scientists from about […]

Bird Studies Canada’s Christmas Bird Count Photo Contest

We would like to share some of your favourite memories from the 2017-2018 Christmas Bird Count! To enter Bird Studies Canada’s photo contest, email us your best shots from this season’s CBC. The contest is open from December 14, 2017 to January 8, 2018. Each participant will be entered into a random prize draw, and three winners will […]

Taxonomy update for 2017

The eBird taxonomy update is essentially COMPLETE. All major changes have occurred, and we have only a small number of minor changes yet to make. This may affect the lists of a very small number of users as we implement these over the next few days. We do this update once each year, taking into account the past 12 months of recent taxonomic knowledge on splits, lumps, name changes, and changes in the sequence of the species lists. As of this point, all eBird data will be reflecting the new taxonomy. This includes your My eBird lists, range maps, bar charts, region and hotspot lists, and data entry. eBird Mobile should also be updated to the new taxonomy. If you see unfamiliar bird names in the list, please refer to the story below to understand the change and why it happened. In addition, we list a number of new options for data entry (hybrids, spuhs, slashes, etc.), all of which are listed below

2017 eBird taxonomy update—IN PROGRESS!

The annual eBird taxonomy update IS CURRENTLY UNDERWAY (Tuesday, 15 August). The process will continue for at least a couple days. We do this once a year to reflect the most recent changes in avian taxonomy: splits, lumps, name changes, and changes in the sequence of the species lists. You may notice some unusual behavior with your lists and other tools (see below), but this is nothing to worry about. The 2017 splits and lumps will be published very soon on this page. We will summarize these changes in an eBird story once the taxonomy update is complete.

eBird Android—automatically track your birding

eBird Mobile for Android took a big step forward this week: the ability to keep ‘tracks’ of where you eBird. Every time you start a checklist on eBird Android, you now have the option to keep a GPS track of where you walk for your traveling counts. The ‘tracks’ automatically calculate the distance traveled and time spent eBirding—all you have to do is watch birds! This is an important new chapter in eBird, opening the door for many exciting new future tools: improved research that can use the actual path you birded, eBird data outputs that can show the precise path of any given checklist, and much more. Plus, it makes your birding even easier. Try eBird Android today.

Change Species on your checklists

Have you ever uploaded a photo or audio recording to an eBird checklist, only to realize after the fact that it’s under the wrong species? Then you had to delete the photo from eBird, go back to your photo archive, and re-upload to the new species. Or if a reviewer notified you about an error on a checklist, just changing an observation could be a bit tricky as well—especially if you had notes, breeding codes, and age/sex information to move over to the new species. This all got a lot easier today: we are excited to announce a new and easy way to edit your checklists with the Change Species button on the checklist editing page. Go to “Manage My Checklists” and choose “Edit Species List” while viewing one of your eBird checklists to change any of your species.

New full-hemisphere eBird animations include Canada for the first time!

Everytime we go birding and submit an eBird checklist, we take a tiny snapshot of bird occurrence in space and time. eBird’s grand vision is to piece all these tiny snapshots together as a global tapestry of bird occurrence. This shared effort to illustrate bird occurrence begins to reveal the complex relationships of our birds to the environment and, as the seasons change, how birds flow around the planet in cycles of dispersal and migration. With this in mind, we are thrilled to share our 2017 STEM models, which are the product of several years of refinements and improvements over the classic eBird Occurrence Maps. STEM (Spatio-Temporal Exploratory Model) is a species distribution model that has been specifically developed for eBird data by statisticians and researchers at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

July eBirder of the Month Challenge

This month’s eBirder of the Month challenge, sponsored by Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, encourages you to share July birding with others. The eBirder of the Month will be drawn from eBirders who submit 15 eligible shared checklists during July. Each shared checklist that you’re a part of gives you one chance to win. These lists may be shared with you from another person, or shared from you to someone else—the only thing is that all people on the shared checklist were birding together. These checklists must be entered, shared, and accepted by the last day of the month. Winners will be notified by the 10th of the following month. Although July is sometimes thought of as a ‘slow month’ for birding, there is actually a ton to learn, see, and share with friends. Read on to see some of the ways that we enjoy birding in July.

Ecological research uses eBird data to show that migratory birds are falling out of sync with the timing of spring

At eBird, our goal is to connect valuable birdwatcher sightings with research and conservation. The eBird checklists that you’ve entered have been used in over 100 peer-reviewed papers, and hundreds of local, regional, and national conservation decisions.

Bird Studies Canada undergoing major data-push to eBird!

eBird’s information about northern Canada’s birds is about to get a whole lot better! Bird Studies Canada (BSC) is beginning to push its extensive Boreal Forest point count data set into eBird. This process has already started with point counts collected during the 2nd Ontario Breeding Bird Atlas.