Welcome to Wisconsin Breeding Bird Atlas II

Birding in the 21st Century.

News and Features

Atlaser Spotlight: Lorri Howski

Who are the incredible volunteers who make the Atlas “go”? It turns out that once you get past the binoculars—or in this case, the camera—our Atlasers are as varied as the bird species they observe. This series turns the spotlight on a few of the many dedicated men and women who have helped the Atlas achieve such tremendous success to date.

This month, meet Lorri Howski of Milwaukee County!

Species Survey Strategy – Colonial Waterbirds Pt. I

Certain waterbird species typically breed in colonies. Preferred spots to find colonial nesters are sites that are protected from predation like an island, a lakeshore, a beaverpond, or even in the cases of some gulls, the roof of a building. Because breeding only occurs in colonial situations, seeing these species in your block is not necessarily indicative of local breeding because they range widely, and therefore codes like H and P are generally not useful for these species. Similarly, FL and FY codes away from nest sites are not reliable because these species disperse widely once fledged.

Check out the tips in this article and then check the blocks around you for some colonial waterbirds!

Mobile Atlasing is easier than ever!

The time has come when you can submit everything you need in at Atlas checklist from just the eBird mobile app! Learn exactly how and remember that there are still circumstances when it will help to use the computer.

Atlas Woodcock Challenge 2017

Take the Woodcock Challenge! Everybody’s doing it.

Nocturnal Atlasing Week 2017

Ready to hear some owls?

Atlasers throughout Wisconsin will be donning their headlamps and heading out for some night birding during Nocturnal Atlasing Week, April 21–29. This time window coincides with an early peak in owl calling, and is a good time to try to hear Barred Owls, Great Horned Owls, Eastern Screech-Owls, and Northern Saw-whet Owls, plus other crepuscular birds like American Woodcock.

Explore your block with new landcover layers on the interactive map!

Wiscland 2 is a new land-cover dataset, created as part of a multiagency effort and hosted by Wisconsin DNR. They used satellite imagery to produce a map that shows different types of land cover types. When Wiscland recently became available, we added it to our atlas interactive map. If you haven’t seen the interactive map, it’s a resource you can use on your computer or your smartphone to quickly see where atlas block boundaries fall, and you can also pull up other informative layers to help you explore your block. Here we’ll walk you through what you need to know to use these layers on the interactive map.

Atlas your way to a lifer!

Is there a life bird, state bird, or county bird in Wisconsin that you really want to see? Not only is the atlas a great way to make a difference for bird conservation, but it’s also a great way to finally get you a glimpse of that nemesis species! Find out how we can help you connect with new species through atlasing.

Species Survey Strategy – Rare Forest Raptors

Two secretive resident raptors can be found across the state’s more remote, contiguous, and mature forest blocks. Wisconsin lies at the southern edge of the continental range for the Northern Goshawk, and the northwestern continental range limit for Red-shouldered Hawk. Each is a Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN), with the Red-shouldered Hawk being listed as state Threatened. Both are among the earliest breeders in the state. The Atlas will play a key role in understanding the current status of these priority species. This article outlines tips and strategies to improve your chances of finding them.

To code or not to code, that is the question. Take our quiz!

With the unseasonably warm temperatures, we’re seeing some early signs of breeding activity. But are they worth entering breeding codes for yet?

Atlaser Spotlight: Pam Campbell

The Wisconsin Breeding Bird Atlas II is a volunteer-driven effort to survey the distribution and abundance of our state’s breeding birds. Since the project started in 2015, our volunteer team has grown to include more than 1,100 Atlasers who have submitted over 55,000 checklists.

Who are these incredible volunteers? It turns out that once you get past the binoculars, our Atlasers are as varied as the bird species they observe. This series turns the spotlight on a few of the many dedicated men and women who have helped the Atlas achieve such tremendous success to date.

This month, meet Pam Campbell of Dunn County!